Age of sail – Sail Theory http://www.sailtheory.com/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 08:31:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.sailtheory.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T011712.182-150x150.png Age of sail – Sail Theory http://www.sailtheory.com/ 32 32 North East Scotland is the perfect inspiration for fantasy fiction http://www.sailtheory.com/north-east-scotland-is-the-perfect-inspiration-for-fantasy-fiction/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 05:00:00 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/north-east-scotland-is-the-perfect-inspiration-for-fantasy-fiction/ North East Scotland is the perfect inspiration for fantasy fiction Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. to cancel An icon depicting a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret A block arrow icon pointing right. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook A Facebook “f” brand icon. Google An icon of the Google […]]]>




North East Scotland is the perfect inspiration for fantasy fiction




































Calendar An icon of a desk calendar.

to cancel An icon depicting a circle with a diagonal line across.

Caret A block arrow icon pointing right.

E-mail An icon of a paper envelope.

Facebook A Facebook “f” brand icon.

Google An icon of the Google “G” brand.

Linked to An icon of the Linked In “in” brand.

Sign out An icon representing disconnection.

Profile An icon that resembles the human head and shoulders.

Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver.

Check A check mark icon.

is public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes.

is not public An icon depicting a human eye and eyelashes crossed by a diagonal line.

Case An icon of a paper folder.

Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background.

Camera An icon of a digital camera.

Caret An icon of a caret arrow.

The clock An icon of a clock face.

close An icon in the shape of an X.

Ellipse A horizontal 3 dots icon.

Envelope An icon of a paper envelope.

Facebook An icon of a facebook logo f.

Camera An icon of a digital camera.

Home An icon of a house.

Instagram An Instagram logo icon.

Linked to A Linked In logo icon.

Magnifying glass An icon of a magnifying glass.

Next An arrow icon pointing to the right.

Opinion An explanatory mark centered within a circle.

Previous An arrow icon pointing left.

Evaluation A star icon.

Label An icon of a tag.

Twitter A Twitter logo icon.

Video camera An icon of a video camera shape.

WhatsApp A WhatsApp logo icon.



Source link

]]>
How Baldwin never forgot September 11 | Herald Community Newspapers http://www.sailtheory.com/how-baldwin-never-forgot-september-11-herald-community-newspapers/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 22:18:33 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/how-baldwin-never-forgot-september-11-herald-community-newspapers/ As we approach the 20e anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and American Airlines Flight 11, it is important to remember the words of Al Ficarola, commander of American Post 246: “The death of our 3,000 innocent people has affected tens of thousands of families. , friends and colleagues… […]]]>

As we approach the 20e anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and American Airlines Flight 11, it is important to remember the words of Al Ficarola, commander of American Post 246: “The death of our 3,000 innocent people has affected tens of thousands of families. , friends and colleagues… We will never forget.

The Baldwinites have never forgotten, for over the years they have honored loved ones lost on that fateful day, including those who left a mark on Baldwin, through ceremonies, plaques, conversations and d ‘education.

For nearly two decades, Baldwin American Legion Post 246 has hosted a memorial at Legion Hall, where attendees receive a motorcycle escort to Freeport for a waterfront service at Miss Freeport, after which the boat sets the sails.

In 2014, more than twenty motorcycles took part in the event, with the help of a police escort. After the ceremony, the crowd of around 60 boarded the Miss Freeport, where the names of the deceased were read aloud and flowers were thrown into the water.

In 2015, it was raining so hard that only a six-bike caravan was present that year, and it was not known throughout the ceremony whether the ship would be able to sail. Among those mourning was a mother Baldwin. Gold Star, Emily Toro, whose son, Army Pvt. Isaac Cortes, was killed in action in 2007 in Iraq. “It is important to know the sacrifice our children make,” she said.

Likewise, Baldwin resident Alan Arias, along with more than 100 of his peers from the New York City Fireriders Motorcycle Club, traveled to Arlington National Cemetery to participate in a three-mile procession to lay a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and commemorate the 9/11 dead.

For the past 20 years, the community of Baldwin has come and worked together to honor those who have died in name and plaque change ceremonies to ensure that the memory of the victims is set in stone.

On April 5, 2003, Tennyson Avenue was renamed Brian McAleese Place in honor of the 36-year-old New York firefighter and father of four who died on September 11 while trying to save people after the World Trade Center attacks. Nearly 100 people attended the unveiling ceremony of the sign bearing his name.

In an interview in 2001, his widow, Dawn McAleese, told the Herald from home: “He loved being a firefighter… He said, ‘When we go to work we don’t know if we’re coming home tonight- the. ‘She added:’ He was definitely a family man. He called the children every day before going to work.

The Town of Hempstead unveiled a memorial at Point Lookout Park in 2016 to mark the 16th anniversary of the terrorist attacks. In the park, there is a meditation square with a memorial table, a granite wall, a 30-foot steel beam from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, and a directional plaque indicating the distance to zero point in the Lower Manhattan.

The granite wall bears the names of those killed in the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. And it’s been updated every year to include the names of those who died of 9/11-related illnesses.

Students in Meredith Healy-Kurz’s Art 2 class at Baldwin High School class also found a way to honor those who perished on September 11, 2011 by creating a mural outside their classroom that depicts a firefighter with his face buried in his hands surrounded by the fallen towers at sunset.

Healy-Kurz said: “It took a few years to be able to discuss the events of September 11 with [the students], but it is imperative that they understand and remember the brave men and women who lost their lives that day.

The Baldwin School District also took on 9/11 education by introducing lessons early in student careers in 2016, including books for each year on the day and its aftermath. They also observed a moment of silence during the morning announcements, after which the students shared their thoughts on the tragedy.

“Our school-aged children were not even born when this tragedy struck our country,” said Baldwin’s Superintendent Dr Shari Camhi. “So it is important for them to know and understand the significance of this event and to remember and commemorate this day in our history.”

2021, however, has been a difficult year to put together and remember September 11 due to the coronavirus pandemic. Nassau County held a socially distant and masked ceremony to remember the 348 Nassau residents who died on September 11, which only a few attended at the Harry Chapin Lakeside Theater in Eisenhower Park in East Meadow, where family members of victims read all the names aloud.

The winner of this 19e Birthday was Luis G. Alvarez, 43, a New York Bomb Squad detective from Oceanside who worked at Ground Zero. He died on June 29, 2019 of complications from cancer caused by his contact with 9/11 debris, just weeks after testimony in Congress extended 9/11.e Victims Compensation Fund.


Source link

]]>
Can Johnson defeat his welfare critics? http://www.sailtheory.com/can-johnson-defeat-his-welfare-critics/ Tue, 07 Sep 2021 23:04:41 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/can-johnson-defeat-his-welfare-critics/ Is Boris Johnson’s welfare plan about to cross the House of Commons? Today, the Prime Minister will unveil the details of the package he is proposing. After presenting his plans to cabinet, he will be on display in the Commons ahead of a 5 p.m. press conference where Johnson will appear alongside Rishi Sunak and […]]]>

Is Boris Johnson’s welfare plan about to cross the House of Commons? Today, the Prime Minister will unveil the details of the package he is proposing. After presenting his plans to cabinet, he will be on display in the Commons ahead of a 5 p.m. press conference where Johnson will appear alongside Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid. Rumors are circulating that No.10 could then opt for a Commons vote this week in the short term – in an effort to bring the plans to fruition before the rebels have time to organize.

However, it is raining lightly on Johnson’s parade because cabinet ministers have so far been kept out. Conservative MPs are on a rampage and while the polls are fairly supportive of the plan, no one can really predict what effect a manifesto promise will so clearly shatter in the next election. As for what Johnson will announce, he is expected to sell it as the “health and social care levy” – the money initially used to clear the backlog and then fund social care.

The concern in the Treasury is that the money will never reach social services – instead, it will all be swallowed up by the NHS. In an effort to allay these concerns, the plan is to “legally reserve” the hike – however, the laws can clearly be overturned. There are also rumors that Johnson may this week announce the end of the triple pension lockdown while it is there – as a way to show that it is not just about the working-age population who are in. takes a hit.

Will the plans go through his cabinet and his party? At 10 Downing Street, cabinet approval is considered the easier of the two. The threat of an imminent reshuffle will certainly draw attention to the consequences of speaking out – but there could always be a minister ready to take a stand. Downing Street sees backbenchers as harder to win. Over the weekend, parliamentarians sent whips quotes from articles suggesting the NI hike is regressive and the welfare plan ineffective. The fact that it is linked with funds to clear the backlog could make opposition more difficult.

With a majority of around 80, Johnson believes he can face his critics. When the Chancellor addressed MPs last night at a 1922 Committee reception, he urged them to keep a united front and, like him, to follow the Prime Minister’s lead. With plenty of objections from MPs worried about the consequences of breaking a manifesto pledge, it will ultimately depend on whether they trust Johnson to make the right decision.


Source link

]]>
The last frontier is open for business http://www.sailtheory.com/the-last-frontier-is-open-for-business/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 18:37:45 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/the-last-frontier-is-open-for-business/ A drastic reduction in start-up costs helps fuel a vision of space not just as a field of exploration or science, but as a true industry. The big picture: In the short term, space is likely to become a place to manufacture high-precision, high-value products that benefit from a microgravity environment. But in the future, […]]]>

A drastic reduction in start-up costs helps fuel a vision of space not just as a field of exploration or science, but as a true industry.

The big picture: In the short term, space is likely to become a place to manufacture high-precision, high-value products that benefit from a microgravity environment. But in the future, as Jeff Bezos noted in July after returning from his space trip, there could be a push to move heavy and polluting industries to space..

Get market news worthy of your time with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free.

In numbers : Space startups made a record $ 7.6 billion investment last year, and a July report from Space Capital found that $ 9.9 billion was invested in all space companies in the second alone. quarter 2021.

  • “We are in the second golden age of space, and it will be a sustained golden age, because it is not only driven by government activity but also by commercial activity,” said Andrew Rush, chief operating officer and president of aerospace company Redwire.

Background: Space enthusiasts have long dreamed of not only exploring, but building in space. But the sheer cost of moving equipment and people into orbit has kept those dreams sci-fi realm.

  • Thanks in large part to the efforts of private companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin, the cost of launching payloads into orbit has fallen dramatically over the past decade, opening up space for smaller players who were previously excluded from industry.

  • “As it gets cheaper and cheaper per kilogram to launch into space, it makes sense that very high value and very expensive items per kilogram are made in space and brought back to Earth,” said Josh Wolfe, co-founder of the venture capital firm Lux Capital, which has invested in several space startups.

Years of work on the International Space Station have shown that microgravity can greatly benefit the manufacture of high-value materials, including fiber optics, drugs, semiconductors, and even bio-printed human organs.

  • “It’s similar to Amazon Prime, but your stuff isn’t made in China,” says Wolfe. “It’s made over China in space.”

  • Varda Space Industries closed a $ 42 million Series A funding round in July to fund its efforts to build a manufacturing platform in space for products made most efficiently in microgravity.

What to watch: Improvements in 3D printing would allow more of the work needed to build commercial infrastructure in orbit to be done, rather than moving rockets from Earth.

  • Made in Space, which is owned by Redwire, put the first 3D printer into space in 2014 and is working on developing an orbital platform for NASA that could assemble structures in space.

  • Such advances can help the space industry become as detached from Earth as possible, notes Joe Landon, vice president of advanced program development at Lockheed Martin.

  • “Ultimately the only thing we’re going to launch from space will be people, because everything else we’re going to build and find resources for outside of Earth’s gravity,” he says.

The trap : Space, as the saying goes, is tough, and as the rate of business launches increases, so does the risk of something going wrong.

  • On Thursday, the FAA grounded Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic after a report in the New Yorker showed that the billionaire’s sub-orbital flight on July 11 had apparently deviated from its course.

  • The space industry faces the “challenge of developing quickly and growing rapidly,” said Joe Schloesser, senior director of ISN, which helps manage security for contractors. “Anyone who has seen this in other industries knows there can be repercussions.”

The bottom line: Business has flourished by exploiting borders, and space is the largest of all.

Like this article ? Get more Axios and subscribe for free to Axios Markets.


Source link

]]>
Glenn Ashby joins Emirates Team New Zealand http://www.sailtheory.com/glenn-ashby-joins-emirates-team-new-zealand/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 05:16:20 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/glenn-ashby-joins-emirates-team-new-zealand/ America’s Cup: Glenn Ashby opens its doors to Emirates Team New Zealand by Shirley Robertson Aug 31 10:51 PM PDT September 1, 2021 Glenn Ashby has an in-race chat with Emirates Team New Zealand chief design officer Dan Bernasconi – two days before ETNZ defends the America’s Cup – March 15, 2021 © Richard Gladwell […]]]>

America’s Cup: Glenn Ashby opens its doors to Emirates Team New Zealand

by Shirley Robertson Aug 31 10:51 PM PDT
September 1, 2021

Glenn Ashby has an in-race chat with Emirates Team New Zealand chief design officer Dan Bernasconi – two days before ETNZ defends the America’s Cup – March 15, 2021 © Richard Gladwell / Sail-World.com / nz

MPU Henr-Lloyd BLU
C-Tech 2021 America's Cup 300x250

Shirley Robertson chats with one of the most influential sailors of the modern America’s Cup era as she interviews Australian Glenn Ashby, in this two-part podcast below.

An integral part of Emirates Team New Zealand, Ashby has just won her third America’s Cup and spoke to Robertson after celebrating the team’s successful defense in March 2021.

Like many of Robertson’s guests, in Part One Ashby reveals that his early days in sailing saw him working in a sail loft, having left school at the age of sixteen, but that he was already made a name on the water. Growing up sailing a lake in Bendigo, Victoria, Ashby’s first time sailing the sea was at age eleven, in a regatta that saw him become junior state champion. From there, only a potential career as a motorcyclist would prevent young Ashby from becoming a professional sailor – motorsport lost the battle, for teenager Ashby, Europe was calling …:

“There was a French man, I heard a bang bang bang on the window, he was throwing stones in the street to wake me up … and I went down to the boat park and the whole fleet was gone, my boat was the only boat on the beach with the tarp. If I hadn’t done this race, I would have lost the regatta! ”

This admission from Ashby during his first regatta victory at the Class A World Championships in 1996. He went on to win nine more Class A world titles, three Formula 18 world titles and three Tornado world titles. His ability to navigate fast cats quickly saw him claim a place at the Olympics where in 2008 he won a silver medal in the outgoing Tornado class with fellow Aussie Darren Bundock.

Inevitably Robertson and Ashby turned to the America’s Cup discussion which itself was starting to take an interest in multihulls for the Deed of Gift Match 2010. Once decided, Ashby’s inclusion was inevitable. After joining BMW Oracle for the 2010 edition, Ashby then began a career with Emirates Team New Zealand, as they sought to win the 34th America’s Cup in San Francisco. What followed for Ashby was a three-Cup campaign with one of the most successful teams of the modern era, but as Ashby reveals, after the crushing loss to San Francisco things could have been very different.

“Sitting in the boardroom with seven or eight people making a decision, with Dalts saying ‘it’s up to you guys, are we closing the doors, or are we keeping them open, what are we doing? “The brutal reality of the doors of a team that had been around for 20 years or so, of having to be part of this decision-making process to close the doors after being so close, it didn’t feel right to me.”

And as Ashby reveals, the comeback has begun. It’s a revealing conversation, as Glenn talks about the “blank sheet of paper” that saw Emirates Team New Zealand ultimately win the 35th America’s Cup in Bermuda. It’s an inspiring story told by one of the pivotal members of the team.

Robertson’s interview with Ashby is a fascinating discussion, taking a behind-the-scenes look at some of the most talked-about Cup moments of the modern era, from the attempt to keep the AC72’s foils a secret before San Francisco to the buyout at the Bermuda and the AC36’s foiling monohulls, all told firsthand by one of the true pioneers of modern sailing.

Support the show – www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast

Part 1

Part 2

Road to Gold - Burling & Tuke MPU
Cyclops 2020 - Dec2020 - MPU


Source link

]]>
An immersive opera experience will be offered on a historic tall ship in New York this evening http://www.sailtheory.com/an-immersive-opera-experience-will-be-offered-on-a-historic-tall-ship-in-new-york-this-evening/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 21:47:53 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/an-immersive-opera-experience-will-be-offered-on-a-historic-tall-ship-in-new-york-this-evening/ On Site Opera, the pioneering New York opera company steeped in site-specific storytelling and immersive experience, in partnership with the South Street Seaport Museum, will bring the opera to the deck of the historic tall ship tonight. Wavertree with What is below. A horse waits in a cobbled street in front of the sailboats moored […]]]>

On Site Opera, the pioneering New York opera company steeped in site-specific storytelling and immersive experience, in partnership with the South Street Seaport Museum, will bring the opera to the deck of the historic tall ship tonight. Wavertree with What is below.

This immersive musical experience will invite small groups to travel outdoors on the ship’s main deck. hear and see vignettes connecting audiences to the complex and tragic stories surrounding American maritime history, both through the enslavement of the African peoples and through the tragic heroes of novelist Herman Melville.

Designated by the National Register of Historic Places, the Wavertree represents the thousands of ships that have docked along New York’s waterfront over the centuries. Built in wrought iron riveted in 1885, Wavertree is an archetype of sailboats from the second half of the 19th century that during the “age of the sail” lined South Street by the dozen, creating a forest of masts from the battery to the Brooklyn Bridge.

Incentives used to lure Africans into slavery at Captain Ahab’s last moments of moral judgment aboard the whaler Pequod in Melville’s Moby dick, What is below will present a series of six unique vignettes featuring works by Amistad, by Anthony Davis and Thulani Davis; Ahab, a monodrama by Juliana Hall and Caitlin Vincent; 1619, a cycle of choral songs by Damien Geter; Billy Budd, by Benjamin Britten, EM Forester and Eric Crozier; Sea fever, by John Ireland and John Masefield; and Riders in the sea, by Ralph Vaughn Williams and John Millington Sygne.

“What excites me about this project is the care, humility and humanistic approach that are central to the design of the program. It is the opportunity to see magic, royalty and resilience of a community of enslaved Africans through their eyes while experiencing the dissonance of the colonial and myopic view of who they were meant to be, ”said Winston Benons, Jr., project co-director and cultural advocate.

Founded in 2012, On Site Opera presents operas in situ in non-traditional venues across New York City. Each production invites New Yorkers to explore their city in new and unique ways, while cultivating a new generation of opera audiences. To date, the OSO has produced 18 operas in as many unique venues, including that of Shostakovich The story of the stupid baby mouse using large-scale puppets in shows for families at the Bronx Zoo; by Gershwin Blue mondayin the historic Cotton Club in Harlem; and that of Rameau Pygmalion at Madame Tussaud’s wax museum, which explored new technologies in opera through the use of Google Glass surtitles.

Located in the heart of New York’s historic South Street Seaport, the South Street Seaport Museum preserves and interprets New York’s history as a great port city. Founded in 1967, the museum houses an extensive collection of works of art and objects, a maritime reference library, exhibition galleries and educational spaces, 19th century printing houses and an active fleet of historic ships that all work to tell the story of “Where New York Starts.”

What is below will be played six times – in live, in-person, 75-minute programs – from August 28 to September 2 at 6:00 p.m.


Source link

]]>
Police raid in Brazil revealed rare 100-million-year-old flying reptile http://www.sailtheory.com/police-raid-in-brazil-revealed-rare-100-million-year-old-flying-reptile/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 18:00:00 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/police-raid-in-brazil-revealed-rare-100-million-year-old-flying-reptile/ In Brazil, police seized a smugglers fossil that turned out to be one of the best preserves ever of a pterosaur, a flying reptile that lived on 100 million years ago. They caught it just in time, as the fossil had been cut up and was about to be shipped out of the country. Now, […]]]>

The pterosaur and a fern, in one render.

In Brazil, police seized a smugglers fossil that turned out to be one of the best preserves ever of a pterosaur, a flying reptile that lived on 100 million years ago. They caught it just in time, as the fossil had been cut up and was about to be shipped out of the country. Now, eight years later, the paleontologists were finally able to give it a good overview and they were delighted.

The fossil belongs to a Tupandactylus navigans, a type of pterosaur from the early Cretaceous period, the beginning of the end of the dinosaur era. First identified in 2003, T. browsers is a tapejarid, a medium sized pterosaur particularly recognizable for the large ridges of soft tissue. (Another example is the larger animal Tupandactylus imperator, whose sail eclipses that of T. browsers.) The savesD T. browsers has a beautiful a veil-like crest jutting out from its head and even a smaller crest running down from the tip of its jaw, like the sharpest chin you’ve ever seen. Tthe apéjarids have been fragmentary in the fossil record, so the recently described fossil revises paleontologists’ understanding of what a creature would look like.

The specimen was found during a police raid in the port of Santos de São Paulo, one of three raids in 2013 who found 3,000 specimens of fossils, intended to be smuggled out of the country. Unfortunately, the illegal trafficking of fossils out of Brazil is a alltoo muchcommon problem in the country; the thousands of fossils recovered by police in 2013 signify a long-standing problem that has yet to find a clear solution.

The 3,000 fossils were confiscated by Brazilian police and ultimately distributed to two Brazilian museums. Today, a team of Brazilian researchers released their analysis of the remarkably well-preserved T. browsers fossil found in the raid. The fossil had been sawn into six pieces but nevertheless offered a unique look at the morphology of the Lower Cretaceous pterosaur. Their results were published in the journal PLOS One.

“Now we have this specimen which not only has the complete skull, therefore the best preserved skull of all. Tupandactyl that we have, but also the almost fully articulated postcranial, ”said Victor Beccari, a paleontologist at the University of São Paulo and lead author of the article, during a video call.

The fossil pterosaur.

“We think this fossil is at least 95% complete, which is already a lot for paleontologists, but for a pterosaur it’s even crazier,” Beccari added. “Not only the bones, but the soft tissue – the crest and the beak. “

The fossil was irreparably damaged during its cutting, which was likely to facilitate transport. (“If we get a fossil with this specimen intact, there is no way in heaven or hell that you will cut the specimen like they did,” Beccari said.) But the smaller slices of the T. browsers The specimen allowed the research team to insert the fossil into a medical-grade CT scanner, imaging each layer of the fossil through the rock. They were then able to create a 3D working model of the shape and size of the entire body of the pterosaur.

“The authors did an excellent job describing in detail all the bone elements, including computed tomography, which brought a new look at morphology… Although it belongs to a known taxon, this specimen provides new information on the tapejarid pterosaurs as well as excellent tissue preservation, which can tell us more about the palaeobiology of the group ”, Alex Aires, a paleontologist at the Federal University of Santa Maria in Brazil who was not affiliated with the research, said In an e-mail.

Based on its morphology, its cephalic crest seemed too large to allow the pterosaur to fly long distances, although it was capable of powered flight – researchers believe he had a land-based foraging lifestyle. This pterosaur was fossilized in the limestone beds of present-day northeastern Brazil. This expanse of stone is called Crato Formation and is renowned for its conditions of conservation. According to other fossils found in this region, the pterosaur’s environment may have been a salt lake.

However, not everything is set in stone with the pterosaur. To beThe ccari team has yet to probe the 3D models they’ve built to better understand how T. browsers may have moved around in their environment. They also want to better understand its ecological niche. What is certain is that none of this would be possible if the fossil had been smuggled out of Brazil as planned.

More: Fossil Poaching and the Black Market in Dinosaur Bones


Source link

]]>
Largs woman reveals how ‘Long Covid’ left her bedridden for eight months after courageous battle with virus http://www.sailtheory.com/largs-woman-reveals-how-long-covid-left-her-bedridden-for-eight-months-after-courageous-battle-with-virus/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 11:11:25 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/largs-woman-reveals-how-long-covid-left-her-bedridden-for-eight-months-after-courageous-battle-with-virus/

A COURAGEOUS woman from Largs has shared how she was left bedridden for EIGHT MONTHS by a crippling strain of coronavirus.

Elizabeth Balmer, who is only 27, initially thought she only had earaches before the disease ravaged her body and robbed her of her independence.

The geology student warned other young people not to take the virus lightly after revealing how it left her with a nightmarish catalog of different symptoms that lasted for a full year.

These included extreme fatigue and severe chest pain.

Elizabeth said: “I spent month after month in bed starting in March and didn’t start to feel a little better until October.

“It was only then that I was able to do a few other things and stabilize my health. I had a very difficult year. The coronavirus was difficult to recover because it not only affected me physically but also mentally. . ”

Her bravery saw her chosen for a coveted place in a sailing adventure for young people affected by the pandemic.

The University of Edinburgh student has been selected as an ambassador for the Our Isles and Oceans project in partnership with the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race, which offers funded sailing programs for young people.

She explained, “In May of this year I was feeling better and when I saw this happen I had to go.

“I was previously a very fit person with no underlying conditions who enjoyed the outdoors. Covid took me by surprise – after my 14 days of self-isolation, I realized I was not starting to feel better like everyone says.

“I checked everything, including my heart and lungs, and was told there was no long term damage. I am a young woman, so people should understand that this virus can attack you regardless of your age.

“At worst, I had very severe chest pain for about ten months, excruciating fatigue and very bad headaches. Pain.

“People with it can experience about 50 different symptoms and as soon as I got rid of it another seemed to develop. It was sometimes really horrible.

“It all started with ear pain, then a week later I had chest pain and couldn’t breathe properly. I was checked twice in the hospital and they found out that it was Covid-19.

“I thought in two weeks I would be over the rain again, but it turned into a nightmare that I never thought would end sometimes.”

Elizabeth has only truly recovered now after a nightmarish year and took the opportunity to embark on the adventure of two-handed sailing – enjoying every minute of it.

Elizabeth, who lives in Brisbane Street with her parents Brian and Elaine, said: “It was amazing. I met amazing people.”

The crew gathered in Oban last Tuesday, visited the Scottish Association of Marine Sciences and sailed to the Isle of Mull and Tobermory, before heading to Coll and Tiree.

Elizabeth, who learned to sail at Largs Yacht Haven, said: “It was an amazing and uplifting experience for everyone involved after their experience with the coronavirus.”

Elizabeth is now aiming to complete her PhD and hopes to earn an opportunity to return to the Mower for a round-the-world race stop.

She said: “I had to take my PhD when I felt bad and started in October part-time. Now I’m going back to full-time and I hope to finish it by the end of the year. next year.

“I don’t know what I’m going to do yet but I would love to teach and do a lot of research, but my eyes are completely open to a career in sailing so if I could combine the two that would be great.”


Source link

]]>
Obituary: William W. (Bill / Mac) McMakin http://www.sailtheory.com/obituary-william-w-bill-mac-mcmakin/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 00:04:07 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/obituary-william-w-bill-mac-mcmakin/ William W. (Bill / Mac) McMakin June 21, 1923 – May 21, 2021 Eagle, Colorado resident Bill (Mac) McMakin passed away peacefully in his sleep on May 21, 2021 in Eagle. He was 1 month away from his 98th birthday and died just 4 months after Martha, his wife of 73 years. The loss of […]]]>

William W. (Bill /

Mac) McMakin

June 21, 1923 – May 21, 2021

Eagle, Colorado resident Bill (Mac) McMakin passed away peacefully in his sleep on May 21, 2021 in Eagle. He was 1 month away from his 98th birthday and died just 4 months after Martha, his wife of 73 years. The loss of this extraordinary couple is deeply felt.

William Wallace McMakin was raised in Hinsdale, Illinois, the 5th of 6 children born to Davis and Adeline (Robbins) McMakin. He knew from an early age that he wanted to fly. After graduating from high school, he enlisted in the Air Force during World War II. He was commissioned from November 3, 1943 to October 29, 1945 in the 8th Air Force, 491st Bomber Group, 852 Squadron. He flew as a captain on B24 in the European theater. He won the Air Medal with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters, a Purple Heart and the EAME Campaign Medal with 5 Bronze Service Stars. Mac didn’t talk about his war experience until later in life, though he still credited the Air Force with opening the skies to him.

After the war Mac, along with other Americans, Canadians and Britons, moved to Amsterdam, the Netherlands, to fly for KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. Many of these early KLM pilots and their families have become lifelong friends. Through one of them, Mac met Martha Diament. Martha played a prank on Mac by pretending to be Dutch, starting a heated relationship that lasted the rest of their lives. Mac and Martha were married on April 23, 1947 at Radnor Friends Meeting in Pennsylvania and continued to live in Amsterdam for 7 years. During this time, the first two of their three children were born.

Mac bought a surplus army jeep and he and Martha, still in their mid-twenties, explored post-war Europe. He also bought a 6 meter sailboat in Rotterdam which had competed in the Berlin Olympics in 1936 and learned to sail without knowing how to swim.

After his stint with KLM, Mac and his family returned to the United States where their third child was born. He started flying for Seaboard World Airlines, doing commercial cargo and passenger flights around the world for 27 years. Over the course of a piloting career that spanned continents and decades, Mac has gained a wide reputation and has often been asked for advice. Just a few years ago, a family friend was at a bar in Shanghai, China, and heard someone refer to Seaboard World. He asked them if they knew Mac McMakin. The answer was, “Damn it, yes! He is the best pilot I have ever met.

After Mac retired from powered flight, he bought a Grobe sailboat and got involved with Freedom’s Wings International. He helped introduce people with disabilities to the joy of flying. He deeply loved his years of flying and found his work with Freedom’s Wings very rewarding.

After leaving Amsterdam, Mac and Martha then lived in Greenlawn, New York; Mill Valley, California; Doylestown, Pennsylvania; and moved to Eagle, Colorado, in 2006. They lived briefly in Lakewood, Colorado in 2020, and after Martha’s death, Mac returned to Eagle.

Above all, Mac was a man of character. He lived his words of honesty and integrity. He believed in an open mind, learning from his mistakes and helping others whenever possible. He believed in the infinite power of the mind and in the value and

strength of the individual. He listened. His enthusiasm for all things was contagious. He was an optimist. For him, all experiences contained the possibility of an opportunity for something new, and he impressed him on his children, grandchildren and many friends.

With his hands and ingenuity, he built a cozy room from an open porch and a guesthouse from a tool shed. He would camp with his family, ski, build go-karts for his kids, and fix everything from clocks to dishwashers. Mac has never been static, never thoughtless and always ready to try something new. He and Martha were surrounded by friends, family and laughter all the time. He was grateful that he had had the opportunity to offer help when needed.

Over the past few years, dementia crept into her mind, confusing time and place, and after 97 years of enjoying every moment of her life, her body gave way. Mac’s last days have been filled with gratitude and sharing memories. He was calm and spoke very fondly of his love for his family and his life.

His family and loved ones find themselves with the cherished space he inhabited within them. We have lost part of ourselves but we are forever grateful and stronger because of him.

Mac and Martha will be together again at Radnor Meeting in Pennsylvania where they were married in 1947.

Mac is survived by daughter Beth McMakin and grandchildren Trent and Blair Ruder; his son Doug McMakin and his granddaughters Lindsay, Laura and Carly, his great-granddaughter Madison; and his son Paul McMakin and his wife Sherry.

A memorial website for sharing memories, thoughts and photos is available at https://www.mykeeper.com/profile/williammcmakin

Memorial contributions can be made to: George Washington’s Mount Vernon or Habitat for Humanity.


Source link

]]>
Why the Taliban’s control over Afghanistan is worse than the fall of Saigon http://www.sailtheory.com/why-the-talibans-control-over-afghanistan-is-worse-than-the-fall-of-saigon/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 12:05:26 +0000 http://www.sailtheory.com/why-the-talibans-control-over-afghanistan-is-worse-than-the-fall-of-saigon/ In recent days, our television screens have filled with images of the disturbing scenes unfolding in Afghanistan. With the Taliban’s takeover of the country now almost complete in just a matter of weeks, thousands of Afghans have fled to Kabul airport in the hope of being evacuated along with civilians and foreign military forces. In […]]]>

In recent days, our television screens have filled with images of the disturbing scenes unfolding in Afghanistan.

With the Taliban’s takeover of the country now almost complete in just a matter of weeks, thousands of Afghans have fled to Kabul airport in the hope of being evacuated along with civilians and foreign military forces.

In the age of smartphones and mobile internet, we’ve seen heart-wrenching scenes unfold just minutes after they’ve happened.

Runways filled with Afghan civilians climbing to board US Air Force transport planes, Apache helicopters buzzing the runway to clear them for take-off and perhaps more tragically, several Afghans have died from a transport plane during take off.

RELATED: Australia’s Chaotic Evacuation Revealed

RELATED: Kabul’s First Rescue Flight lands in Perth

Despite the extremely difficult circumstances on the ground and the airport compound being surrounded by the Taliban, more American and Australian troops are moving towards Kabul to rescue stranded civilians and refugees.

The collapse of the Afghan army and government, followed by the disastrous evacuation of civilians and refugees, has been compared to the fall of Saigon in 1975, when South Vietnam fell to North Vietnamese forces.

But the two events may not have as much in common as they might at first glance.

RELATED: Secret Mission In Afghanistan Underway

The final evacuation of American forces, refugees and foreign nationals from Saigon took place over two days, from the grounds of the Defense Attaché’s office and the gardens of the American Embassy.

When Saigon fell, two US Navy aircraft carrier battle groups were present not far from the shore, along with dozens of other warships. Nearby, two other carrier strike groups stood ready to provide logistical and air support for the ongoing evacuation.

This led to some of the most iconic footage from the entire Vietnam War, as South Vietnamese military helicopters were pushed from flight decks into the sea to make room for others to disembark more refugees. .

The Mekong River flowing through Saigon also provided a valuable escape route for South Vietnamese refugees, who were able to board boats and sail to the standby US fleet.

RELATED: Journalist Receives Call From Taliban Live On Air

The besieged defenders of Kabul airport have none of these advantages and are stranded about 100 km from the borders of neighboring Pakistan.

The only huge advantage they currently have is the runway in good condition, giving Allied forces the ability to facilitate the departure of large numbers of people on fixed-wing aircraft.

Pentagon estimates suggest that up to 5,000 people can be evacuated from the airport per day, as long as the runways remain clear and free from damage.

In order to ensure that the evacuation can take place safely, the United States has reached an agreement with the Taliban to ensure that passage out of the Kabul airport can be done without interference.

According to an Associated Press report, the two sides have apparently agreed to a “deconfliction mechanism” in which operations at Kabul airport are allowed to continue.

While it was not in the Taliban’s best interests to prevent the evacuation, the idea that more than 10,000 Americans would actually be left at the mercy of the Taliban was unthinkable at the start of the war to oust them from power there. almost 20 years ago.

Yet here we are.

About 7,000 US troops, along with those from allied nations such as Australia, will defend an airport perimeter of more than 10 km for potentially weeks, depending on the number of Afghan refugees evacuated.

In contrast, the last stage of the American evacuation of Saigon took place from the lawns and roof of the American Embassy, ​​an area of ​​just over one hectare, surrounded by a high wall.

For those still stranded in Afghanistan and the Allied troops currently there, the coming weeks should be a nervous wait, as the evacuation continues in an effort to clear tens of thousands of people safely. security, under extremely difficult circumstances.

From Afghan refugees preventing operations from re-filling the runways, to concerns about rogue Taliban commanders failing to keep their superiors’ word, Kabul airport defenders face a difficult time in the days to come.

While the current situation in Afghanistan may appear, on the surface, similar to the fall of Saigon, in reality it is much worse.

It took two years of heavy fighting for the South Vietnamese forces to be exhausted by the North Vietnamese.

The Afghan army, for its part, withdrew in a few weeks.

Ultimately, this collapse and the utter lack of preparation by U.S. and Allied officials created a situation that is arguably worse than the fall of Saigon.

And the world is watching.

Tarric Brooker is a freelance journalist and social commentator | @AvidCommenter



Source link

]]>