Physics of sailing – Sail Theory http://sailtheory.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 11:11:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sailtheory.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T011712.182-150x150.png Physics of sailing – Sail Theory http://sailtheory.com/ 32 32 Government Engineering College, Palamu admits 192 students in inaugural session https://sailtheory.com/government-engineering-college-palamu-admits-192-students-in-inaugural-session/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 08:06:50 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/government-engineering-college-palamu-admits-192-students-in-inaugural-session/ MF AHMAD Daltonganj, 21 November: The Government Engineering College (GEC) in Basoura village under Nilamber Pitamberpur (former name Lesliganj) in Palamu district has started operating from the current academic session 2022-23. This engineering school is the first state engineering school in Palamu which already has two other engineering schools – one from DAV on the […]]]>

MF AHMAD

Daltonganj, 21 November: The Government Engineering College (GEC) in Basoura village under Nilamber Pitamberpur (former name Lesliganj) in Palamu district has started operating from the current academic session 2022-23.

This engineering school is the first state engineering school in Palamu which already has two other engineering schools – one from DAV on the road to Betla National Park and the other from BJP MLA Ramchander Chandravanshi in the block of Bishrampur.

Technical and Higher Education Secretary Rahul Kumar Purwar said, “Lesliganj GEC started accepting admissions in the first year of the 2022-23 academic session. The inaugural admissions are quite encouraging “We have delegated a renowned teacher, Professor Sanjay Kumar Singh from BIT Sindri, to act as the principal officer of the college.

“There are bound to be start-up problems for any technical institute when it starts, but we are determined to ensure that academic activities run smoothly over time,” he added.

When contacted, BIT Professor Sindri Sanjay Kumar Singh said, “As of the third round of Jharkhand Combined Entrance Examination Board Advisory, 192 admissions in the first year of the 2022 academic session -23 took place. We still have a series of advice to do and we hope that this new GEC Lesliganj can reach 200 admissions in its first year.

The fourth round of consultations, which began on November 18, will end on November 23.

Notably, GEC Lesliganj started with 4 disciplines including Electrical, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There are a total of 349 seats taking into account 4 disciplines which include a quota for economically weaker sections, people with disabilities and a quota for military personnel, etc.

The Director in Charge of GEC Lesliganj, Prof. Singh said, “Under the guidance of the State Technical Department of Higher Education, I resumed construction of this GEC from NBCC only on November 11.”

He conceded that one faculty from each of the 4 disciplines has been delegated from BIT Sindri until the appointment of faculties is completed here.

Professor Singh said that the first year engineering course consists of basic sciences like Maths, Physics, Chemistry, English, Graphics etc, these 4 teachers will be teaching online until that new arrangements are not made.

“The State Department of Higher Technical Education is very keen to get things in order here and whatever resources we have at present, we will try to get it done well for the benefit of our students enrolled here. and who are manufacturing engineers,” Professor Singh added.

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A Few of My Favorite Things with Jade Emerald Pinto ’25 – The Bates Student https://sailtheory.com/a-few-of-my-favorite-things-with-jade-emerald-pinto-25-the-bates-student/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 01:47:18 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/a-few-of-my-favorite-things-with-jade-emerald-pinto-25-the-bates-student/ There’s a lot that Jade Emerald Pinto ’25 (she/they) could be proud of when she looks back on her year and a half so far at Bates. There are the two clubs she founded, for example, or the fact that she remains physically active as a member of the sailing team and the hip-hop team […]]]>

There’s a lot that Jade Emerald Pinto ’25 (she/they) could be proud of when she looks back on her year and a half so far at Bates. There are the two clubs she founded, for example, or the fact that she remains physically active as a member of the sailing team and the hip-hop team 2BEATS. There’s the fact that she excels academically, with a major in physics and a minor in Asian studies, or that she spent the summer doing astronomy research at Bates. But the thing that brings the proudest smile to Pinto’s face is none of that; it’s the fact that last Tuesday, “we had 20 people wake up at 3 a.m. to come and see the eclipse that turned the moon red,” she says.

This event was spearheaded by the current iteration of the Bates Astronomy Club, of which Pinto is a founder and president. She and her Vice President Brandon Gustavo Villalta López ’25 are working to create space for astronomy nerds and curious stargazers to turn their eyes skyward. The club was born over the summer, while the couple spent the summer at Bates together studying galaxy evolution and outflow (“which is basically the energy that comes out of galaxies,” Pinto explains) under the direction of Professor Aleks Diamond-Stanic.

“We both really like astronomy; that’s what I plan to do after I graduate,” says Pinto. But at Bates, “basically, there are only two astronomy classes”; they are integrated into the Department of Physics and Astronomy, the second half of which is often forgotten. The solution, for Pinto and López, was clear: “We need the Astronomy Club back!”

Bates had an astronomy club several years ago, but it faded when the students running it graduated. Over the past few years, Pinto says, much of the department’s equipment has “gathered dust.” The top floor of Carnegie Science has had an observatory for decades, “and yet there are only five people trained for it in the whole school,” Pinto says. So over the summer, Pinto and López got to work “talking, like, ‘Okay, how do we get a club back to Bates? How does this work?’ We sent an email to Coram to find out if there were any leftover things from the last club, we spoke to teachers who are in the physics department, I was trained for the observatory. It was a lot of steps!

These steps took a lot of time and effort, but Pinto didn’t let the hard work detract from the reason they run the club: a laid-back love for the beauty of the universe. A physics major who regularly watches Disney movies and an aspiring college student who enjoys the simple pleasure of lying on her back in a field with a friend gazing at the stars as much as she does astronomical calculations and lab work, they are both intelligent and gentle – and value both equally. With the clever awe of a student fascinated by the beautiful mysteries of the cosmos and the perspective and connection they can foster among simple earthlings, Pinto told us some of their favorite things about their time at Bates, their experiences with Bates Club astronomy, and the things they see when they choose to look up.

Favorite things about running the Bates Astronomy Club:

“I love outreach,” says Pinto. “I like to show people that yes, astronomy is physics, but you don’t have to be in physics to like astronomy. Anyone can join the club. Like, the lunar event. Everyone said, ‘Well, I’m studying anthropology.’ I was like, ‘This is sick! Like, yes, come watch the moon with us! There is no qualification you need to sit and gaze at the moon. It’s really fun to bring together a whole bunch of different people.

Favorite activity (past or planned) with the club:

The eclipse viewing was the club’s first event, but more are in the works. His favorite item on the drawing board, Pinto says, is his plan to get Bates funding and a few white vans, and take the students camping and stargazing in Acadia National Park. “We also have a lot of access to telescopes that are easier to travel with, not just the huge ones at the top of Carnegie,” Pinto says. “So yeah, that’s the plan: go camping, take some telescopes, steal some students and, yeah, make it a weekend.”

The trip will likely be “a small collaboration with the Outing Club,” says Pinto. “They don’t know yet.”

Favorite thing to see in the sky:

Pinto is an egalitarian at heart — valuing events that non-physicist nerds can appreciate and celestial objects you don’t have to be an expert to appreciate — and their favorite things in the sky are no exception. . The blood moon caused by last week’s eclipse, for example, was a favorite “just because you didn’t really need any equipment to see it,” they say.

Their favorite constellation is Orion, for a similar reason. “I feel like Orion brings people together because everyone can see Orion,” they say. Even in New York, Pinto’s hometown, “when probably one of the stars is a helicopter, you can still see Orion. And it’s pretty awesome. You don’t need to know a constellation to see the three stars that unite Orion.

Favorite astronomy experience:

This fall, Pinto traveled with his research partner López to the SACNAS Conference on National Diversity in STEM in Puerto Rico. “That was probably my favorite thing about astronomy…being able to not only talk science with other people, but also have a powwow,” she says. “From 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. you talk about all the scientific jargon, then from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. you party and listen to Hispanic music.” She and López presented some of their research and ate lots of good food.

Favorite Thanksgiving dish:

“My answer might have been different nine years ago, but now I’m a vegetarian,” Pinto says. These days, “my favorite Thanksgiving dish is deviled eggs, because I can only ask my aunt to make them for me this holiday. And they are so good!

“It’s like an aunt thing,” Pinto says. “Don’t tell my mother.”

Preferred study location on campus:

“Oh damn. I get distracted so easily!” Pinto said. When it’s really time to strap in, they head to an audio room on the ground floor of the Ladd Library. “I’m participating in the Disney section… I’m going to play a little Disney movie in the background,” Pinto laughs. With only one seat per room, “I call the office; I get dibs. And then I do my job, and Rapunzel sings in the background. ‘is good.”

Favorite life lesson from the Bates Astronomy Club:

“The most important lesson I learned was not to keep yourself on the same level as people, especially from their past, but to realize that you are in the same place as them now,” Pinto says. They attended an arts-focused high school, and transitioning to a STEM major at a top university often left them feeling “I like astronomy, but maybe someone knows more.” than me. It can hurt your self-esteem,” they admit.

But if the ever-expanding universe has taught him anything, it’s that the past doesn’t limit the future; there is always room to grow. “It’s like I’m the president of the astronomy club now!” Pinto laughs. “It doesn’t matter who took which math class in high school. We are all Batesies and we are all here.

Wherever you come from, says Pinto, the most important thing is that today “we all observe the stars together”.

***

Students interested in gazing up at the sky with other happy stargazers can follow the club’s Instagram page at @BatesAstronomyClub or email Pinto at [email protected]

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WOW2: Women Pioneers of November and Events in Our History https://sailtheory.com/wow2-women-pioneers-of-november-and-events-in-our-history/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 23:29:08 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/wow2-women-pioneers-of-november-and-events-in-our-history/ “Feminism is the radical notion that women are human beings.” – Cheris Kramarae, feminist studies scholar “The whole world has opened up to me when I learned to read.― Mary McLeod Bethune,African-American civilian andWomen’s Rights Leader,Educator, member of FDR’sFederal Council of Negro Affairs(his “dark room”) WOW2 is a four times a month sister blog to […]]]>
“Feminism is the radical notion that women are human beings.” – Cheris Kramarae, feminist studies scholar

“The whole world has opened up to me
when I learned to read.
Mary McLeod Bethune,
African-American civilian and
Women’s Rights Leader,
Educator, member of FDR’s
Federal Council of Negro Affairs
(his “dark room”)


WelcometoWOW2.jpg

WOW2 is a four times a month sister blog to This week in the war on women. This edition covers stories from From November 9 to November 16.

The next episode of WOW2 will take place on Saturday, November 19, 2022.

_________________________

“…I wish you remembered the ladies
and be more generous and supportive towards them
than your ancestors. Do not put such an unlimited
power in the hands of husbands. Remember,
all men would be tyrants if they could. so special
care and attention is not given to ladies, we are
determined to foment a rebellion, and will not stand
ourselves bound by laws in which we have no
voice or representation. That your sex is naturally
tyrannical is a truth so well established that it
admit no dispute; but those of you who wish to be
glad willfully give up – master’s hard tide
for the most tender and endearing of a friend.
Why, then, not put it out of the power of the vicious
and the lawless to use us with cruelty and indignity
with impunity?”
Abigail Adamsin a letter to her
husband John dated March 31, 1776

_________________________

“I raise my voice ― not so I can shout but
so that those who have no voice can be heard…
we cannot succeed when half of us are held back.

Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani Pashtun
advocate for the education of girls and women,
winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014

_________________________

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The purpose of WOW2 is to discover and honor successful women, including those who have been ignored or marginalized in most history books, and to mark moments in women’s history. It also serves as a reference archive on women’s history.

These pioneers have much to teach us about perseverance in the face of overwhelming odds. I hope you find as much inspiration as I do in reclaiming our past..

symbol_woman_-_minuscule.jpg

THIS WEEK IN THE WAR ON WOMEN
will be posting shortly, so be sure to check it out next, and
catch up latest dispatches from the front.

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What DART scientists have learned so far about the asteroid Didymos https://sailtheory.com/what-dart-scientists-have-learned-so-far-about-the-asteroid-didymos/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 10:00:47 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/what-dart-scientists-have-learned-so-far-about-the-asteroid-didymos/ Crashing a spacecraft into an asteroid isn’t NASA’s usual approach to planetary science, but it was certainly an opportunity nonetheless. NASA Asteroid Double Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft slammed into a small asteroid called Dimorphos on September 26 to test a potential technique to protect Earth, should we end up on a collision course with a […]]]>

Crashing a spacecraft into an asteroid isn’t NASA’s usual approach to planetary science, but it was certainly an opportunity nonetheless.

NASA Asteroid Double Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft slammed into a small asteroid called Dimorphos on September 26 to test a potential technique to protect Earth, should we end up on a collision course with a large space rock. But the impact also gave planetary scientists a close, albeit fleeting, view of the smaller asteroid any spacecraft has visited to date.

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Funeral Notice, October 23, 2022 https://sailtheory.com/funeral-notice-october-23-2022/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 08:30:22 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/funeral-notice-october-23-2022/ Carolyn Virginia (Sinkey) Sanchez Born in Gillette, Arkansas on April 2, 1937 Died in Avra ​​Valley, Arizona on October 7, 2022 Passionate and compassionate; loving and caring. Devoted to God, family and humanity. Always found the good in people. She and Joe owned and operated the Sanchez Market and ran the Butterfield Court trailer and […]]]>





Carolyn Virginia (Sinkey) Sanchez Born in Gillette, Arkansas on April 2, 1937 Died in Avra ​​Valley, Arizona on October 7, 2022 Passionate and compassionate; loving and caring. Devoted to God, family and humanity. Always found the good in people. She and Joe owned and operated the Sanchez Market and ran the Butterfield Court trailer and apartment in the 1960s in south Tucson. She never refused credit to anyone. When she was younger, she served in the US Army Medical Corps. Served valiantly at Brooks Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland and culminated his military career at Letterman Hospital at the Presidio in San Francisco. Active with Tully PTA Primary School in the late 60’s and early 70’s. Pioneered the Avra ​​Valley with her family in tow in 1973. For 50 years her home was ‘THE’ boys’ club and girls. She nurtured, counseled and loved the children of Avra ​​Valley, Marana, Silverbell, Rillito and Picture Rocks. Her kindness is etched in the hearts of all who knew her. Predeceased by his son, Eddie and his daughter, Angela. Survived by her husband, Joe; brother Virgil Sinkey (Linda Jo). sons, Dennis (Penny), Charles (Therese), Bryan (Denise), Samuel (Jennifer); Daughter, Linda. Grandchildren, Cameron, Sabrina, Brandon, Bethany, Cody, Christy, Matthew, Anthony, Zachary, Sigourney, Nicole and J J. Great-grandchildren, Rhianna, Christian, Arienette, Kammee, Ayden, Lavianna, Abel, Joaquin and Kaia. His presence will forever remain in our minds, hearts and souls. We are deeply grateful to Jennifer Carlile (NP) and staff at MHC, MHC Pharmacy, Dr. Karen LeMaster (staff) of Arizona Oncology, Hospice of the West’s Verdelle, Pam, Frank and staff, and to Marana Mortuary for their love and compassion. Visitation and memorial service will be held at Marana Mortuary, 12146 W Barnett Rd., Marana, Az at 9 a.m. November 1, 2022. Cemetery service and interment will follow at Arizona Veterans Memorial Cemetery, 15950 N Luckett Rd., Marana, Az at 11 a.m.

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How the Wynnum Manly Radio Model Yacht Club is Curing a Sailing Addiction for Many Boaters https://sailtheory.com/how-the-wynnum-manly-radio-model-yacht-club-is-curing-a-sailing-addiction-for-many-boaters/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 21:42:36 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/how-the-wynnum-manly-radio-model-yacht-club-is-curing-a-sailing-addiction-for-many-boaters/ Nearly two dozen yachts – white sails spread and flapping in the breeze – race back and forth on a day of sparkling blue skies at Manly Harbor in Brisbane. Passers-by, especially children, stop in awe of the action. “Oh look at that one,” a little boy says to his parents. “I like red and […]]]>

Nearly two dozen yachts – white sails spread and flapping in the breeze – race back and forth on a day of sparkling blue skies at Manly Harbor in Brisbane.

Passers-by, especially children, stop in awe of the action.

“Oh look at that one,” a little boy says to his parents.

“I like red and orange,” he adds.

This is no ordinary yacht race.

These yachts are much smaller than you might think.(ABC News: Lucas Hill)

This is because ordinary yachts are way too big for this event.

It is a race of miniature radio-controlled yachts, the largest of which is about one meter long.

Life-size boats and cruisers, moored in the harbor, serve as a backdrop for the debates.

Boaters, mostly men over 60 with a passion for boating, line the shore, wide-eyed as they maneuver the rudders and sails via remote control.

Members of the Wynnum Manly RC Yacht Club race their craft
Club members are mostly men over the age of 60.(ABC News: Lucas Hill)

“It’s just a lot of fun – using all your experience, not getting wet, racing all the other guys,” said Wynnum Manly Radio Model Yacht Club (WMRMYC) Commodore Russell Gray.

“The jokes are fantastic. We have a session once in a while on why old men are grumpy – they should do this!”

how it started

It all started when two men decided to sail their model yachts around Wynnum Paddling Pool in the late 1980s.

A club formed in 1996 and since then it has become a passion for a growing number of people.

Man holding radio controlled model yachts in Manly Harbor race
The club has existed since 1996.(ABC News: Lucas Hill)

Eduard (Eddie) Cowell is one of the first two sailors to have started at Wynnum Wading Pool. He now has a race named after him – a three-day international event, held in Kawana.

“The Eddie Cowell Perpetual Trophy! It’s pretty flattering to be honest,” he said.

Eddie’s love for sailing began at the age of 13, when Australia won the America’s Cup in 1983.

Eddie Cowell, member of the Wynnum Manly radio-controlled model yacht club
Eddie Cowell started sailing at age 13 until his life took a dramatic turn.(ABC News: Sally Eeles)

But he would never reach the open sea as he had hoped, because a few years later his life changed irrevocably.

“I had a diving accident – a diving accident at home,” Eddie said.

“I jumped off a fence into a shallow pool when I was 17.”

“I’m a quadriplegic. It was terrible, but you get used to it and I’ve made the most of my life.”

A man watches the boats in the water.
Eddie has won many events over the years.(ABC News: Sally Eeles)

Despite the accident, Eddie’s fascination with sailing never wavered. When he saw a display of model ships at the supermarket, he decided to sue it.

“I thought it was something I could get into. I tried to find one and found a guy in Toowoomba who would make them,” he said.

“We just started sailing on a Monday morning and more and more people were walking past us and saying, ‘Where did you get that?'”

“So it just grew, and now they have world titles, they have state titles — all kinds of things.”

A close up of a model yacht in the water.
Eddie enjoys competition but especially appreciates the social aspect.(ABC News: Lucas Hill)

Unlike the other members of the club, whom Eddie affectionately calls ‘able-bodied’ (able-bodied), he cannot run to shore to check how his yacht is tracking or even use both hands to operate his radio control.

“I can’t use my fingers. I have a control that does the winch and the rudder,” he said.

“It’s quite difficult. The ‘valid’ cannot do it. They are surprised that I can do it,” he added, laughing.

“It’s the only sport I can compete against able-bodied people – being disabled.”

Eddie has won numerous events over the years, from North Queensland to New South Wales.

“In my youth, I did. I’m not as competitive as I used to be. Now I do it more for social reasons,” he said.

A cure for sailing addiction

There are many sailors like him.

Andrew Wilson has been sailing since the age of five.

“When my dad built my first boat on our kitchen table,” he said.

Andrew Wilson launching a yacht.
Andrew Wilson has been sailing since the age of five.(ABC News: Sally Eeles)

He has competed in some of Australia’s biggest ocean races – Sydney Hobart, Brisbane to Gladstone, Fremantle to Bali.

“If you’re really serious about offshore racing, you have to prepare for very little sleep. You have to train and adapt your mind and body to sleeping 15 minutes an hour – brutal diets like this. here – in addition to being cold and hungry,” he says.

“I found out after a year or two that it wasn’t for me.”

However, there was no cure for his sailing addiction.

“There’s a lot of satisfaction in sailing alone. You have a lot of time to reflect and a lot of time to relax and enjoy nature,” he said.

“But a lot of people like the competition and it’s a low cost competition where you can still be with a bunch of buddies – laugh and play.”

Radio controlled model yachts racing in Manly Harbor
Miniature radio-controlled yachts line Manly Harbour.(ABC News: Lucas Hill)

The threat of club closure

It was Andrew’s expertise that was called upon a few years ago when a complaint – the club’s first in 25 years – threatened to shut them down.

A boat owner claimed lines from the club’s signal buoys could get tangled in the propellers and cause an accident.

“We were told we couldn’t navigate here any longer and I was looking around at the members here – many of them well over 80 – and one or two had tears of blood in their eyes,” he said.

“I wasn’t happy about that so I went off and had a chat with a friend of mine who is very good at electronics and I said ‘can we do buoys without an anchor? “”

Andrew Wilson holding a radio-controlled buoy.
Andrew Wilson’s idea saved the club’s future.(ABC News: Sally Eeles)

Turns out they could.

“It’s two little motors. There’s a GPS, an accelerometer and a gyroscope in that little package. The GPS drives it to the location and when you tell it to stop, it stops and stays on it. “

Not only did the invention mean that the model yacht could continue to cruise in Manly Harbour, there is now offshore interest and orders for motorized GPS-equipped buoys.

A ‘Men’s Shed’ on the water

Russell Gray and his wife spent three years sailing the Queensland coast and learned so much during that time that he wanted to pass on his knowledge.

A man with a hat is holding a radio-controlled boat.
Russell is now helping run a 10-week course in model sailing yachts.(ABC News: Lucas Hill)

The club now offers a 10-week course in model sailing ships.

“It’s like a ‘Men’s Shed’ on the water,” he said.

“The ‘Men’s Shed’ is a meeting place for old people. It teaches you how to use tools and that. We teach people how to sail or how to get better at sailing.”

Grant McDuling is a recent graduate.

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James Webb Space Telescope reveals new surprises about the galaxy’s organic molecules https://sailtheory.com/james-webb-space-telescope-reveals-new-surprises-about-the-galaxys-organic-molecules/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 17:18:35 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/james-webb-space-telescope-reveals-new-surprises-about-the-galaxys-organic-molecules/ Tiny dust molecules known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most common organic molecules in the universe and are important astronomical tools. For example, they are considered fundamental building blocks of prebiotic compounds, which may have played a key role in the origin of life. PAH molecules produce extremely bright emission bands in […]]]>

Tiny dust molecules known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most common organic molecules in the universe and are important astronomical tools. For example, they are considered fundamental building blocks of prebiotic compounds, which may have played a key role in the origin of life. PAH molecules produce extremely bright emission bands in the infrared region when illuminated by stars, allowing astronomers not only to track star-forming activity, but also to use them as sensitive barometers of stars. local physical conditions.

This new analysis, led by Dr Ismael García-Bernete of the University of Oxford’s Department of Physics, used the JWST’s state-of-the-art instruments to characterize, for the first time, the properties of PAHs in the nuclear region of three luminous active galaxies . The study was based on spectroscopic data from the James Webb Space Telescope’s MIRI, which specifically measures light in the 5 to 28 micron wavelength range. The researchers then compared the observations to the theoretical predictions for these molecules.

Surprisingly, the results overturned those of previous studies that had predicted that PAH molecules would be destroyed near the black hole at the center of an active galaxy. Instead, the analysis revealed that PAH molecules can actually survive in this region, even where high-energy photons could potentially tear them apart. A potential reason could be that the molecules are shielded by large amounts of molecular gas in the nuclear region.

García-Bernete said: “The JWST MIRI gives us a fantastic opportunity to observe galaxies in a way that has simply not been possible until now. We were thrilled to discover that these organic molecules can actually survive in extremely harsh conditions. »

However, even where PAH molecules survived, the results showed that supermassive black holes at the hearts of galaxies had a significant impact on their properties. In particular, the proportion of larger and neutral molecules became more important, indicating that smaller and more fragile charged PAH molecules may have been destroyed. This severely limits the use of these PAH molecules to probe how quickly an active galaxy is creating new stars.

“This research is of great interest to the wider astronomical community, especially those focused on planet and star formation in the most distant and faint galaxies,” García-Bernete said. “It is amazing to think that we can observe PAH molecules in the nuclear region of a galaxy and that the next step is to analyze a larger sample of active galaxies with different properties. This will allow us to better understand how PAH molecules survive and what their specific properties are in the nuclear region. Such knowledge is essential for using PAHs as an accurate tool to characterize the amount of star formation in galaxies, and therefore, how galaxies evolve over time.

– This press release was originally published on the Oxford University website

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Death toll in migrant boat wrecks in Greek waters rises to 23 https://sailtheory.com/death-toll-in-migrant-boat-wrecks-in-greek-waters-rises-to-23/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 22:43:04 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/death-toll-in-migrant-boat-wrecks-in-greek-waters-rises-to-23/ LONDON: A senior Somali official has claimed the UK has lost its place among the world’s leading nations, with dire consequences for the Third World. Abdirahman Abdishakur Warsame, the presidential envoy for the Somalia drought response, told the Guardian while on a tour of Europe to mobilize his country’s support that the UK’s loss of […]]]>

LONDON: A senior Somali official has claimed the UK has lost its place among the world’s leading nations, with dire consequences for the Third World.

Abdirahman Abdishakur Warsame, the presidential envoy for the Somalia drought response, told the Guardian while on a tour of Europe to mobilize his country’s support that the UK’s loss of status is hurting developing countries because that he has played a crucial role in advocating on their behalf on issues such as food security and climate change.

Warsame, who holds dual British and Somali nationality, said the UK was second only to the US internationally in terms of influence, but is now letting its allies down.

As a result, he said, countries like his are left alone to face “the new climate reality”, the international community’s promises to access the poorest states to a $96.8 billion climate fund. dollars not materializing.

“We are living with the deadly consequences of climate change in Somalia,” he added. “Millions of children are malnourished, many will die and we don’t have a penny from this climate fund.”

He added, “Everybody said, ‘When you declare a famine, you’ll get attention.’ We are facing more than the magnitude of 2011, when we lost a quarter of a million of our fellow citizens. But in 2011, half the people died before famine was declared.

“We are more than famine in Somalia. We are coming out of a long conflict and have had successful and peaceful elections; we build our institutions, we build our national army, we push back Al-Shabaab. But at the same time, we have this drought.

“During the 2017 drought, the UK and its leadership were vital, its advocacy and energy was tremendous, and it encouraged people like me to match that commitment. Britain was a great ally of Somalia , but all that is gone.

“The UK is always an ally, and they help with security, but when it comes to humanitarian response, they are not there, neither in leadership nor in helping. It’s all gone. The UK used to provide leadership that others would follow.

Warsame criticized a concern for Ukraine by European nations for glossing over impending climate-related disasters, including the famine in Somalia.

“No one cares about climate, food security,” he said. “It’s all ‘Ukraine, Ukraine, Ukraine.’ It attracts all the political attention.

He added: “If we hadn’t had Ukraine, COVID-19 and the locust invasion (2019-2022), the effect might be less, but the drought is caused by climate change.

“We have had four failed rainy seasons now. The drought cycle used to be every 10 years, now it is four years and soon it will be two years. It’s not caused by Somalia – it was caused by the climate crisis.

Warsame said climate funds, diverted to technology, infrastructure, agriculture and fisheries, would stave off the threat of famine in Somalia if they had access to the $96.8 billion pot.

“Somalis are resilient people. They face all the pressures of insecurity and drought, and the world can learn from them how to be resilient in the face of such pressure,” he added.

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What drives ecosystems to instability? https://sailtheory.com/what-drives-ecosystems-to-instability/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 18:16:26 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/what-drives-ecosystems-to-instability/ CAMBRIDGE, MA – Trying to decipher all the factors that influence the behavior of complex ecological communities can be a daunting task. However, MIT researchers have now shown that the behavior of these ecosystems can be predicted based on just two pieces of information: the number of species in the community and the strength with […]]]>

CAMBRIDGE, MA – Trying to decipher all the factors that influence the behavior of complex ecological communities can be a daunting task. However, MIT researchers have now shown that the behavior of these ecosystems can be predicted based on just two pieces of information: the number of species in the community and the strength with which they interact with each other.

In studies of bacteria grown in the laboratory, researchers have been able to define three states of ecological communities and calculate the conditions necessary for them to change from one state to another. These discoveries allowed the researchers to create a “phase diagram” for ecosystems, similar to the diagrams physicists use to describe the conditions that control the transition of water from solid to liquid to gas.

“The amazing and wonderful thing about a phase diagram is that it summarizes a lot of information in a very simple form,” says MIT physics professor Jeff Gore. “We can draw a frontier that predicts the loss of stability and the onset of fluctuations in a population.”

Gore is the lead author of the study, which appears in Science. Jiliang Hu, an MIT graduate student, is the lead author of the paper. Other authors include Daniel Amor, a former MIT postdoc; Matthieu Barbier, researcher at the Plant Health Institute of the University of Montpellier, France; and Guy Bunin, professor of physics at the Israel Institute of Technology.

Population dynamics

The dynamics of natural ecosystems are difficult to study because while scientists can make observations about how species interact with each other, they usually cannot do controlled experiments in nature. Gore’s lab specializes in using microbes such as bacteria and yeast to analyze interspecific interactions in a controlled way, in hopes of learning more about the behavior of natural ecosystems.

Over the past few years, his lab has demonstrated how competitive and cooperative behaviors affect populations and identified early warning signs of population collapse. During this time, his lab gradually expanded from studying one or two species at a time to larger-scale ecosystems.

As they worked to study larger communities, Gore became interested in trying to test some of the predictions that theoretical physicists have made about the dynamics of large, complex ecosystems. One of these predictions was that ecosystems go through phases of varying stability depending on the number of species in the community and the degree of interaction between species. In this framework, the type of interaction (predatory, competitive or cooperative) does not matter. Only the strength of the interaction counts.

To test this prediction, the researchers created communities ranging from two to 48 species of bacteria. For each community, the researchers controlled the number of species by forming different synthetic communities with different sets of species. They were also able to enhance species interactions by increasing the amount of food available, which leads to greater population growth and can also lead to environmental changes such as increased acidification.

“In order to see phase transitions in the lab, it’s really necessary to have experimental communities where you can turn the knobs yourself and make quantitative measurements of what’s going on,” says Gore.

The results of these experimental manipulations confirmed that the theories had correctly predicted what would happen. Initially, each community existed in a phase called “full and stable existence”, in which all species coexist without interfering with each other.

As the number of species or interactions between them increased, communities entered a second phase, known as “stable partial coexistence”. In this phase, populations remain stable, but some species have disappeared. The overall community has remained in a stable state, which means that the population is returning to a state of equilibrium after the extinction of certain species.

Finally, as the number of species or the strength of interactions increased further, communities entered a third phase, characterized by greater population fluctuations. Ecosystems have become unstable, meaning populations are constantly fluctuating over time. Although some extinctions have occurred, these ecosystems tended to have a larger overall fraction of surviving species.

Predict behavior

Using this data, the researchers were able to draw a phase diagram that depicts how ecosystems change based on just two factors: the number of species and the strength of interactions between them. This is analogous to how physicists are able to describe changes in the behavior of water based on just two conditions: temperature and pressure. Detailed knowledge of the exact speed and position of each water molecule is not necessary.

“Although we cannot access all the biological mechanisms and parameters of a complex ecosystem, we demonstrate that its diversity and dynamics can be emergent phenomena that can be predicted from a few aggregate properties of the ecological community: size of the species pool and statistics of interspecific interactions,” says Hu.

Creating this type of phase diagram could help ecologists make predictions about what might happen in natural ecosystems such as forests, even with very little information, because all they need to know , is the number of species and their degree of interaction.

“We can make predictions or statements about what the community is going to do, even in the absence of detailed knowledge of what is happening,” says Gore. “We don’t even know which species help or hurt which other species. These predictions are based solely on the statistical distribution of interactions within this complex community.

Researchers are now investigating how the flow of new species between otherwise isolated populations (similar to island ecosystems) affects the dynamics of those populations. This could help shed light on how islands are able to maintain species diversity even in the face of extinction.

– This press release was originally published on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology website

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The deeper change behind Asmodee Digital’s rebranding https://sailtheory.com/the-deeper-change-behind-asmodee-digitals-rebranding/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 13:00:08 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/the-deeper-change-behind-asmodee-digitals-rebranding/ Asmodee Digital, the longtime provider of digital board game adaptations, has had something of a revamp. The most obvious example is its recent name change, with the company announcing that as of last month it now operates as Twin Sails Interactive. Less than a week after the unveiling of the new brand, we caught up […]]]>

Asmodee Digital, the longtime provider of digital board game adaptations, has had something of a revamp.

The most obvious example is its recent name change, with the company announcing that as of last month it now operates as Twin Sails Interactive. Less than a week after the unveiling of the new brand, we caught up with Gamescom’s General Manager Nicolas Godement, who told us the name was “the face of a deeper change that’s been going on for about 18 months.”

“As Asmodee Digital, we were known for digital board game conversions, primarily on mobile and PC,” he says. “Over the past year or two, we’ve expanded our lineup of titles to games that are just games – all-new, third-party, indie, AA video games, so not just digital board games. That’s something which we did for strategic reasons, and we wanted a name that both expresses the fact that we have introduced a wider range of games, but also speaks to our values ​​and who we already are.”


The new Twin Sails Interactive logo

Godement says the two ships represented by the Twin Sails logo can be seen as the publisher and its development partners venturing together, adding that the hobby of sailing “evokes notions of unity, passion and maybe a little adventure,” which he cites as company values.

While Asmodee Digital has undeniably carved out a place for itself in the tabletop gaming space, much like its parent of the same name, it’s also true that the games division has diversified, bringing in strategy and turn-based titles. per turn like Terraforming Mars and Gloomhaven in the market. . Twin Sails aims to go further.

Along with the rebranding announcement, the publisher unveiled two new titles: Studio Nul News’ tycoon management game Tower and Lumorama’s 2D physics-based platformer Amberial Dreams. The latter in particular represents a significant departure for the Twin Sails team, bringing the company into a more traditional video game space where titles rely on action and antics faster than the relatively relaxing mechanics of board games. . A quick look at the company’s lineup trailer shows there’s still more variety to come, with titles like top-down action game Ember Nights (pictured above) and the Dark Envoy RPG adventure.


Godement says bringing different types of games to market will build on the skills he and his team have developed as Asmodee Digital, where he says the company has essentially built what he calls a ” publishing engine”.

“We don’t have in-house developers, but we have a lot of producers, brand managers, PR people, etc.,” he says. “We don’t think it should be limited to one genre. It’s very different from development – I was a developer before and I think it’s good for developers to specialize in one genre. [to] build up know-how. But for a publisher, we think it’s a bit different, so we thought broadening our horizons to different genres was a way to optimize how we use that publishing engine, that team, and work on games. which perhaps speak to more players.


Nicolas Godemont, Twin Sails Interactive

“It’s also a way to bring new content into Asmodee that wouldn’t otherwise be part of our company, as well as reach new players that we wouldn’t usually reach.”

There is another important factor behind this change; in December 2021, Twin Sails’ parent company Asmodee was acquired by Embracer for €2.75 billion.

“Suddenly, video games were much more important to Asmodee than they had ever been,” Godement explains. “It’s not that they weren’t important before, but suddenly it’s super important for us to understand video games, to have a presence, to do business in this space.”

That’s not to say that Embracer took Asmodee and its video game division away from its roots. On the contrary, Godement asserts that the company has as much freedom as it had before the acquisition.

“The things you hear on Embracer, how indifferent but supportive they are — that’s exactly it,” he says. “For us, it doesn’t create any form of day-to-day constraint, other than financial reporting for the markets. So if you ask the finance team, you might get a different answer, but if you ask no anyone on the game team, there is no holding back and plenty of opportunity.

“Suddenly we have access to a network of tens of thousands of game professionals that we can share information and best practices with. We can do projects together – we’ve already announced that Saber is going to port Gloomhaven to consoles – so How awesome is it to have such great company on our game? [It’s] lots of opportunities and no constraints.”

Naturally, Embracer ownership also opens up access to a host of popular intellectual properties. Asmodee has already done well in this regard when it comes to the table, but Embracer has taken over successful game franchises for years – in its latest wave of acquisitions it bought Midde-Earth Enterprises and with him the rights to JRR Tolkien’s famous fantasy series.

“Maybe we’ll get the chance to work on that at some point,” says Godement. “We already have a Lord of the Rings game in our portfolio, but maybe we could have another.”

“Suddenly, video games were much more important to Asmodee than they had ever been”

With any brand change comes the need to re-educate. Asmodee has established itself as a household name in the tabletop market, both physically and digitally, but Twin Sails is arguably a name as wide as its wallet, so it can be difficult for gamers to know what s ‘expect. Godement, however, remains optimistic.

“Being able to announce ahead of Gamescom and meet with partners and potential partners here, I feel like this transition will actually be quite quick,” he says. “We don’t hide that we are Asmodee, we are proud to be part of Asmodee, it’s a fantastic company. So in terms of branding and visibility, I don’t think we encounter too many challenges.

“The challenge is more about moving your business model from one specific genre to multiple genres, supporting games that are already in development and you release them. This is no longer new to us, we’ve been doing this for 18 months, but initially, yeah, learning how to select those games, building the process, it was a lot of work. It still is.”

The Twin Sails team is around 30 strong, so Godement is keen to walk ahead of the newly renamed publisher launching, estimating the company will be limited to three to five games launching per year.

“We want to do quality work, we want to evolve gradually,” he explains. “If in ten years we have 500 people, of course we’ll release more games. Or maybe we won’t, we’ll just release bigger games.”

As for what the publisher is looking for, Godement says Twin Sails will focus on premium console, PC, and mobile games that are “midsize, high-end for AA.” The team is also keen on finding experiences with lots of replay value that get players started every day, and titles with innovative game design.

“There are things we wouldn’t do, like survival horror,” he continues. “It’s very hardcore, very tough – we have nothing against it, it’s just not something we’re comfortable with as a company. Or sims that are very realistic, great hard to do and super hard to understand – I don’t think we would go there.

“It’s mostly a team thing. We like teams that are receptive to the way we work, that are aware that we can disrupt the development process, but in the end you’ll have a better game.”

Finally, he emphasizes that the connection to the board game remains very open. Although Twin Sails does not handle it directly, it is possible that particularly successful games will get the tabletop treatment from Asmodee in the future.

“Even before the Embracer acquisition, one of our studios – Fantasy Flight Games – has always been known for bringing video game brands into board games, like Fallout, Civilization and XCOM. So that’s something something we’ve always done, and now that we’re part of Embracer, it’s probably something everyone wants to do more of.”

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