Physics of sailing – Sail Theory http://sailtheory.com/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 05:59:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sailtheory.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T011712.182-150x150.png Physics of sailing – Sail Theory http://sailtheory.com/ 32 32 Microsoft Flight Simulator update could lead to a virtual space shuttle https://sailtheory.com/microsoft-flight-simulator-update-could-lead-to-a-virtual-space-shuttle/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 18:05:00 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/microsoft-flight-simulator-update-could-lead-to-a-virtual-space-shuttle/ In a recent behind-the-scenes video, the head of Microsoft Flight Simulator Jorg Neumann took a field trip Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. The stated purpose was to promote the game 40th Anniversary Update, which will add iconic planes like the Spirit of St. Louis and the Wright Flyer to the game […]]]>

In a recent behind-the-scenes video, the head of Microsoft Flight Simulator Jorg Neumann took a field trip Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. The stated purpose was to promote the game 40th Anniversary Update, which will add iconic planes like the Spirit of St. Louis and the Wright Flyer to the game in November. Speaking to Polygon a few days prior, Neumann also revealed that he and his team were considering an even bigger addition — the space shuttle Discovery.

“I flew to Washington and had this exact conversation with people who actually have a space shuttle,” Neumann told Polygon in an interview. “I have to sign an agreement and it will take some time. But, fundamentally speaking, can we? Should we? I think we should.”

Microsoft Flight SimulatorThe 40th Anniversary Edition will be a free update for the base game. It will feature a number of new aircraft, including those mentioned above, as well as a huge upgrade to its already robust physics system. This is called the “Fluid Dynamics Simulation” module, and it is extremely important for the implementation of two new types of aircraft: helicopters and gliders.

Fixed-wing aircraft — the majority of which can be flown by Microsoft Flight Simulator currently – generating lift by flying into the wind, using the powerful thrust generated by an engine to create forward speed that pulls an aircraft off the ground and into the air. Rotary wing aircraft, including helicopters, operate very differently. While the vehicle itself remains stationary, the helicopter’s engine spins its wings – called rotors – around the airframe to generate lift. The rotors can be adjusted so that the lift axis can be tilted forwards and backwards, or side to side, to give the vehicle speed. This style of flight requires a completely different and much more complex physics simulation, hence the November update.

Gliders require even more subtlety to simulate virtually. This is because these planes have no engine at all. Instead, pilots must rely on the air around them to contribute both to speed and elevator to their cells. Neumann understands gliders on a deep level. In fact, he started riding them in his tweens.

“That’s actually how I grew up,” Neumann said. “They teach you to look for certain kinds of cloud chains that spin a certain way. It’s hard to say, but when you fly there, that’s where the air spirals up, and you can fly your glider there and spiral it in. That’s how you gain altitude because the thing has no motor. […] You have to read the air, which is a little different from what we’ve done so far.

Things get a bit trickier when trying to land a glider. Since there’s no motor to propel you out of a bad landing, you essentially only get one hit to hit the runway. Miscalculate and you’ll have to lose weight – in the form of ballast, usually water – in order to gain enough lift to try and land somewhere else.

“I remember coming to a pitch,” Neumann said. “I missed the airport, as often. All you see are trees and fields and you think to yourself, OKAY. And sometimes I had to drop water to get over the trees just to land.

Once Microsoft Flight Simulator can accommodate gliders, it can accommodate the most sophisticated glider ever made, the space shuttle.

As NASA’s reusable launch vehicle soared into orbit atop huge liquid-fueled rockets, it returned to Earth without any power, streaking through the upper atmosphere at 16,000 miles per hour before slowing to a paltry 215 miles per hour on touchdown. And – unlike baby Jorg Neumann cruising the Rhine – the shuttle pilots had no ballast to drop or nearby terrain large enough for a crash landing.

There are no firm plans in place at this time to bring Space Shuttle Discovery to Microsoft Flight Simulator. But, after the November update, the platform will have everything it needs – hopefully including a deal with the Air and Space Museum – to make it happen.

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Scientists develop plant-based antimicrobial food packaging to replace plastic https://sailtheory.com/scientists-develop-plant-based-antimicrobial-food-packaging-to-replace-plastic/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 16:41:55 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/scientists-develop-plant-based-antimicrobial-food-packaging-to-replace-plastic/ In an effort to produce eco-friendly alternatives to plastic food packaging and containers, a Rutgers scientist has has developed a biodegradable vegetable coating which can be sprayed on food, protecting against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and transport damage. The evolutionary process could potentially reduce the negative environmental impact of plastic food packaging and protect human […]]]>

In an effort to produce eco-friendly alternatives to plastic food packaging and containers, a Rutgers scientist has has developed a biodegradable vegetable coating which can be sprayed on food, protecting against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms and transport damage.

The evolutionary process could potentially reduce the negative environmental impact of plastic food packaging and protect human health.

“We knew we had to get rid of the petroleum-based food packaging that exists and replace it with something more sustainable, biodegradable and non-toxic,” said Philip Demokritou, director of the Nanoscience and Advanced Materials Research Center, and Henry Rutgers Chair in Environmental Nanoscience and Bioengineering at the Rutgers School of Public Health and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. “And we asked ourselves at the same time, ‘Can we design food packaging with functionality to extend shelf life and reduce food waste while improving food safety?'”

Demokritou added: “And what we have developed is a scalable technology, which allows us to transform biopolymers, which can be derived as part of a circular economy from food waste, into smart fibers that can wrap food directly. This is part of next-generation, “smart” and “green” food packaging.

The research was conducted in conjunction with scientists from Harvard University and funded by the Harvard-Nanyang Technological University/Singapore Sustainable Nanotechnology Initiative.

Their article, published in the scientific journal natural food, describes the new type of packaging technology using polysaccharide/biopolymer fibers. Like the webs cast by the Marvel comic book character Spider-Man, the stringy material can be spun from a heated device that resembles a hair dryer and “shrinkable” over foods of various shapes and sizes, such as a avocado or sirloin steak. The resulting material that wraps food products is strong enough to protect against bruising and contains antimicrobial agents to fight against spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms such as E.coli and listeria.

The research paper includes a description of the technology called focused rotary jet spinning, a process by which the biopolymer is produced, and quantitative evaluations showing that the coating extended the shelf life of avocados by 50%. The coating can be rinsed off with water and degrades in soil within three days, according to the study.

The new packaging aims to solve a serious environmental problem: the proliferation of petroleum-based plastic products in the waste stream. Efforts to limit plastic use, such as legislation in states like New Jersey to eliminate the distribution of plastic bags in grocery stores, can help, Demokritou said. But he wanted to do more.

“I’m not against plastics,” Demokritou said. “I am against petroleum-based plastics that we keep throwing away because only a tiny fraction of them can be recycled. Over the past 50 to 60 years, in the age of plastic, we have released 6 billion metric tons of plastic waste into our environment. They’re out there slowly degrading. And these tiny fragments end up in the water we drink, the food we eat and the air we breathe.

Mounting evidence from Demokritou’s research team and others points to potential health implications.

The article describes how the new food-encapsulating fibers are mixed with natural antimicrobial ingredients – thyme oil, citric acid and nisin. Researchers from the Demokritou research team can program these smart materials to act as sensors, activating and destroying bacterial strains to ensure food arrives intact. This will address growing concerns about foodborne illnesses and reduce the incidence of food spoilage, Demokritou said.

Harvard University scientists who conducted the research include Kevin Kit Parker, Huibin Chang, Luke Macqueen, Michael Peters and John Zimmerman of Disease Biophysics Group, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and Jie Xu, Zeynep Aytac, and Tao Xu of the Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health.

– This press release was provided by Rutgers University

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Woodrow V. Seamone, retired from Johns Hopkins https://sailtheory.com/woodrow-v-seamone-retired-from-johns-hopkins/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 19:07:20 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/woodrow-v-seamone-retired-from-johns-hopkins/ Woodrow V. “Woody” Seamone, 96, of Lewes, and formerly of Rockville, Md., died Tuesday, June 7, 2022 at The Moorings at Lewes. He was born March 28, 1926 in Philippi, W.Va., the son of the late John and Angele Seamone. Woody joined the Navy shortly after his 17th birthday, logging 50 flying hours before the […]]]>

Woodrow V. “Woody” Seamone, 96, of Lewes, and formerly of Rockville, Md., died Tuesday, June 7, 2022 at The Moorings at Lewes. He was born March 28, 1926 in Philippi, W.Va., the son of the late John and Angele Seamone.

Woody joined the Navy shortly after his 17th birthday, logging 50 flying hours before the end of World War II. After leaving the Navy, he attended Catholic University, earning a degree in aeronautical engineering. Woody worked primarily at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, from 1953 until his retirement in 1991. In 2007, he received a Master Inventor Award from Johns Hopkins University, given to personnel holding at least 10 U.S. patents; Woody held 13.

A family vacation in Delaware led to the purchase of a beach cottage in Dewey Beach in 1967 with his first wife, Teresa. Woody and Teresa moved there full-time in 1991. He became active at the Cape Henlopen Senior Center, serving as president of the Lower Delaware Computer Club for several years, and volunteering as a tax aide. In 2007 he moved to The Moorings in Lewes with his late wife Jude Seamone, where he enjoyed the Photography and Computer Club and building model ships.

Woody was a loving father, grandfather, great-grandfather and friend. He loved sailing, working with computers and anything to do with technology. He will be missed by many relatives and friends.

In addition to his parents, Woody Seamone was predeceased by his beloved first wife of 44 years, Teresa Seamone; his dear second wife of 25 years, Jude Daly Seamone; and his grandson, Kevin Seamone. He is survived by his five children: Joseph Seamone (Debbie), Ken Seamone (Chris), Cindy Yingling (Dave), Mark Seamone (Emma) and Kathleen Race (Rick); his 11 grandchildren; his 13 great-grandchildren, his sister, Polly Poffenberger; and Jude Seamone’s family.

A Christian Burial Mass will be held at 10:30 a.m. Friday, June 24, at St. Jude The Apostle Catholic Church, 152 Tulip Drive, Lewes, where friends may visit from 10 a.m. The burial will be private.

All are welcome to join Mass via livestream by visiting YouTube and searching St. Jude the Apostle, Lewes.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Parsell Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Atkins-Lodge Chapel, Lewes.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions to Cape Henlopen Senior Center, 11 Christian St., Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971.

Visit Mr. Seamone’s Life Memorial webpage and sign his virtual guestbook at parsellfuneralhomes.com.

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Summer Game Fest 2022 Boosts Modern Warfare 2 With ‘ShipAF’ Mission Showcase https://sailtheory.com/summer-game-fest-2022-boosts-modern-warfare-2-with-shipaf-mission-showcase/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 20:45:26 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/summer-game-fest-2022-boosts-modern-warfare-2-with-shipaf-mission-showcase/ Activision recently revealed a small preview of the Modern Warfare 2 campaign during the Summer Game Fest Livestream 2022. The developers displayed a mission of the game’s campaign with Shadown Company, which is a military faction in the game. Summer Game Fest 2022 is active, and with plenty of content to show its audience, Activision […]]]>

Activision recently revealed a small preview of the Modern Warfare 2 campaign during the Summer Game Fest Livestream 2022. The developers displayed a mission of the game’s campaign with Shadown Company, which is a military faction in the game.

youtube cover

Summer Game Fest 2022 is active, and with plenty of content to show its audience, Activision didn’t shy away from doing so when the spotlight was on them. They generously shared footage from a mission from their upcoming shooter, Modern Warfare 2.

After months of waiting, fans finally get a glimpse of what the game actually looks like and how its mechanics might work. This does not clarify the actual performance of the game, but it gives an idea.


The “ShipAF” mission in Modern Warfare 2 brings back nostalgia among Call of Duty fans

The Modern Warfare 2 showcase at Summer Game Fest 2022 features a Dark Water mission that shows members of Task Force 141 with Mexican Special Forces infiltrating an oil rig. It’s a similar mission that brings nostalgia to Call of Duty players who played the original Modern Warfare 2 back in 2009.

The trailer released yesterday also showed off this Dark Water mission. Infinity Ward said that moving the crates you see is something they want to do in MP, but cannot guarantee that the crates’ locations consistently match server lag/lag. https://t.co/JHuoHKdIwI

The mission begins with some of the task force members joined by Alejandro Vargas, a campaign figure infiltrating an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. The platform consists of a missile in cargo storage, which has the potential to trigger a global conflict. The task force members act on the information and cross on a boat to the platform, along with Shadow Company.

The team cleans up the rig and begins to climb into the oil rig (Image via Activision)
The team cleans up the rig and begins to climb into the oil rig (Image via Activision)

Footage shows Soap, Ghost, and Mexican Special Colonel Alejandro Vargas taking over the mission as they silently infiltrate the rig during cover of dark water and night. When the team reaches the bottom of the platform, they begin sneaking back up, taking down enemies from cover and hiding bodies.

Members of the task force fighting enemy militia atop the oil rig (Image via Activision)
Members of the task force fighting enemy militia atop the oil rig (Image via Activision)

Once they reach the top platform, that’s where the pictures start to shine. The gameplay displays several combat engagements and weapons in use. Footage shows the player using molotoves and firing gas barrels to stoke the fire. As for guns, a suppressed rifle and SMG were shown in platforming combat.

Soon the mission takes an unexpected turn as it is revealed that the missile controls are on a nearby ship.

COLLAR.  Alejandro Vargas alongside members of Task Force 141 sailing to catch the nearby ship with missile controls (Image via Activision)
COLLAR. Alejandro Vargas alongside members of Task Force 141 sailing to catch the nearby ship with missile controls (Image via Activision)

The audience can then see how members of the task force and Mexican special forces board a boat to grab the nearby ship. The level is carefully designed so that players keep their heads up all the time, the covers of the ship always move when the ship itself tilts, the water physics and animations are also in all their glory.

A task force member uses a shotgun to make close engagements (Image via Activision)
A task force member uses a shotgun to make close engagements (Image via Activision)

The footage shows the player using a shotgun at the end to deal with close combat, while sliding on the ship and heading for the door for a breach. This is where the little tease ends when the camera cuts out.

It’s a huge treat for fans as this mission takes players back to the original Modern Warfare 2 in 2009, resembling a similar task called “The Only Easy Day……Was Yesterday”, with players infiltrating an oil rig.


For more on the Summer Game Fest, announcements and reveals, keep an eye out for Sportskeeda’s coverage of it here.



Edited by Sijo Samuel Paul

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Legendary sailor Tracy Edwards and her historic yacht Maiden have arrived in Brooklyn https://sailtheory.com/legendary-sailor-tracy-edwards-and-her-historic-yacht-maiden-have-arrived-in-brooklyn/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 22:20:30 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/legendary-sailor-tracy-edwards-and-her-historic-yacht-maiden-have-arrived-in-brooklyn/ Maiden was greeted upon arrival at New York Harbor with an armada that included an FDNY fireboat. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle Famous sailor Tracy Edwards and her racing yacht Maiden arrived in Brooklyn on Wednesday, greeted by an armada that included an FDNY fireboat pumping celebratory jets of water into the air as it […]]]>

Maiden was greeted upon arrival at New York Harbor with an armada that included an FDNY fireboat. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle

Famous sailor Tracy Edwards and her racing yacht Maiden arrived in Brooklyn on Wednesday, greeted by an armada that included an FDNY fireboat pumping celebratory jets of water into the air as it sailed past the Statue of Liberty .

Edwards led the first all-female sailing team to compete in the grueling 33,000 mile Whitbread Round the World Race (now known as The Ocean Race) in 1989/1990. Braving dangerous seas and overcoming rampant sexism, Tracy and her teammates came second, breaking the gender barrier for competitive sailing along the way.

“We defied the doubters and not only ‘survived’, but we won two races and finished second overall,” Edwards told the Brooklyn Eagle.

Edwards’ achievement (her results were the best for a British yacht since 1977) earned her an MBE (Most Excellent Order of the British Empire), and she was the first woman to receive the ‘Yachtsman of the Year’ trophy. “. His exploits – from his rebellious teenage years to his lifelong friendship with his mentor, King Hussein of Jordan – have been immortalized in the Sony film MAIDEN, available on Amazon. (See trailer here.)

Winning the Whitbread brought no prize money, and Edwards was forced to sell Maiden at its conclusion.

Famous sailor Tracy Edwards on her way to greet her yacht Maiden in New York Harbor. Maiden is currently docked at ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle

“I tracked her down in 2014 and raised funds to save her and return her to the UK where we have restored her to her former glory,” Edwards said. Maiden is now on a three-year world tour with a new mission: The Maiden Factor Foundation works with, raises funds and supports communities to enable girls’ education.

The goal is “a world where every girl has access to 12 years of quality education, empowering them to choose their future and achieve their dreams,” Edwards said.

Tracy Edwards spots Maiden as she enters the harbour. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle

The Eagle joined Edwards and a group of other sailors and supporters on the yacht Full Moon to greet Maiden and her all-female crew as she sailed to Brooklyn. Maiden’s sailors gracefully cruised through the harbor to the marina, where Edwards jumped off the full moon to embrace the beaming crew.

Maiden is currently moored at ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina in Brooklyn Bridge Park, where Edwards and the crew will host community events at local schools and youth groups.

“We are thrilled to welcome a sailing legend like Tracy and the entire Maiden crew,” said Marina Wharfmaster Sam Barrett Cotter. “Anyone who hasn’t seen the Maiden documentary should drop what they’re doing, get on Amazon prime, and give it a watch. It’s an incredibly inspiring story, not just about a woman breaking the gender barrier in the world sailing, but about people facing immense adversity as they conquer the most dangerous seas on the planet, and for them to stop here in Brooklyn is an honor and a privilege.

ONE°15 is hosting a fundraising event at Estuary Restaurant on Monday, June 6 where Edwards will speak. “Guests will meet her and the crew and even get to tour the boat they sailed around the world on. Our chef Dennis is roasting a Hawaiian-style suckling pig – it will be a great event,” Barrett said. Cotter (Register with EventBrite).

Tracy Edwqards, left, with Sandy Murray. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle

Other Events: On June 9 from 5 to 7 p.m., a flotilla will escort Maiden from Brooklyn to the Hudson River Maritime Museum in Kingston.

Maiden will visit the historic Mary A. Whalen ship in Red Hook, Brooklyn on Wednesday, June 22 from 10 a.m. to approximately 1 p.m.

Supporters salute Maiden

Among those present to greet the young girl were Wendy Lin, Sadia Zaman and Kaitlin Cho, graduates of the Hudson River Community Sailing Program’s Sailing Academy Youth Development Program.

“I watched the MAIDEN documentary and thought it was absolutely fantastic,” Cho said. “I also had the opportunity to interview him and ask him about his experience working with the crew, and eventually I also got to work with one of his other crew members, Dawn Riley.”

The young women were accompanied by the organization’s director of communications and development, Maeve Gately.

“We work with local public middle and high school students who learn to sail and build wooden boats,” Gately said. “They are learning STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering and Math] through sailing – like the physics of how a sail works or the marine life of the Hudson River.

World class sailors Paul Wilson and Brita Siepker introduced themselves and explained why they are passionate about Maiden.

Maiden docked at ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle

“Brita quit her job and sailed around the world, and is extraordinarily committed to female empowerment,” Wilson said of Siepker. “She did all kinds of things on her travels to help children, especially girls. She’s a huge fan of what Maiden does.

Of Wilson, Siepker said, “Paul is a U.S. National Championship sailor. He saw the movie for the first time with me and also became a huge supporter. He is well known for always having women on the boat. In several U.S. Nationals, he’s had a full women’s crew – she’s another empowering woman.

“I’m here because I love Tracy and I love supporting her mission and her passion to help young women and women in general, and I love being out on the water,” former owner Jeanne Andlinger said. of the P2 superyacht. “I just want to be part of them coming in and supporting them.”

Mack Edwards-Mair, daughter of Tracy Edwards. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle

Andlinger’s friend Lee Robb accompanied her on the trip to greet Maiden.

“I love boats,” she says. “I’ve lived in the British Virgin Islands for years so this is a wonderful opportunity to be out on the water.” She added, “This is the first I’ve heard of Tracy’s story. It’s so exciting.”

“I’m here because Tracy was kind enough to give me the opportunity to donate to the cause and honor my aunt who passed away a few years ago,” John Ebbert said. “It was a great Great Lakes matelote.”

“I’m a friend of a women’s group called Women Who Sail on Facebook. We also include non-binary people,” said Anne Bryant, a resident of Brooklin, Maine, who sails a 27-foot wooden sloop. “At the end of the summer of 2020, we had a series of talks on Mondays called Maiden Mondays – there were five in a row, and we helped with the big fundraising campaign.”

Maiden gracefully crosses New York Harbor on her way to Brooklyn. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle

“The documentary was the first time I was featured,” Bryant said. “I had no idea that Tracy had already worked on my behalf in the sailing world to ensure that I would have a place in the water.”

Mack Edwards-Mair, Tracy’s daughter, quietly oversaw the event. Although inspired by the ship and the crew, she does not sail herself, she said. Instead, she’s the events manager for The Maiden Factor, flying from stop to stop. “I’m based where the boat is.”

Tracy Edwards greets the Maiden crew at ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle
From left to right: Sandy Murray, Tracy Edwards and Tosh Barron. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle
World class sailors Brita Siepker and Paul Wilson. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle
Sailing enthusiast Wendy Lin with Tracy Edwards. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle

Tracy Edwards, left, and Anne Bryant. Photo: Mary Frost, Brooklyn Eagle
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French Open 2022 results: Djokovic and Nadal win Friday singles results | Launderer’s report https://sailtheory.com/french-open-2022-results-djokovic-and-nadal-win-friday-singles-results-launderers-report/ Mon, 30 May 2022 07:10:11 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/french-open-2022-results-djokovic-and-nadal-win-friday-singles-results-launderers-report/ Ian MacNicol/Getty Images Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal headlined the players in action Friday at Stade Roland Garros as the third round of the 2022 French Open kicked off in Paris. Alexander Zverev and Carlos Alcaraz were also on the program as part of a star-studded first half of the men’s draw at the second […]]]>

Ian MacNicol/Getty Images

Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal headlined the players in action Friday at Stade Roland Garros as the third round of the 2022 French Open kicked off in Paris.

Alexander Zverev and Carlos Alcaraz were also on the program as part of a star-studded first half of the men’s draw at the second Grand Slam tournament of the season.

It’s a different story on the women’s side, where a series of upsets left no top-10 seeds in the bottom half of the table, creating a path to the finals for some unexpected contenders. Notable names to take court included Victoria Azarenka and Coco Gauff.

Let’s take a look at the full list of singles results, which will be updated at the end of Friday’s game. This is followed by a recap of some of the day’s best matches.


Results Men

(1) Novak Djokovic d. Aljaz Bedene; 6-3, 6-3, 6-2

(3) Alexander Zverev d. Brandon Nakashima; 7-6 (2), 6-3, 7-6 (5)

(5) Rafael Nadal m. (26) Botic van de Zandschulp; 6-3, 6-2, 6-4

(6) Carlos Alcaraz d. (27) Sebastien Korda; 6-4, 6-4, 6-2

(9) Felix Auger-Aliassime d. Filip Krajinovic; 7-6 (3), 7-6 (2), 7-5

(21) Karen Khachanov d. (10) Cameron Norrie; 6-2, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4

(15) Diego Schwartzman d. (18) Grigor Dimitrov; 6-3, 6-1, 6-2

Bernabé Zapata Miralles d. (23) John Isner; 6-4, 3-6, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3


Women results

(17) Leylah Fernandez d. (14) Belinda Bencic; 7-5, 3-6, 7-5

(23) Jil Teichmann d. (15) Victoria Azarenka; 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (5)

(18) Coco Gauff d. Kaia Kanepi; 6-3, 6-4

Aliaksandra Sasnovitch d. (21) Angelique Kerber; 6-4, 7-6 (5)

(27) Amanda Anisimova d. Karolina Muchova; 6-7 (7), 6-2, 3-0 out.

(31) Elise Mertens d. Varvara Gracheva; 6-2, 6-3

Martina Trevisan d. Daria Saville; 6-3, 6-4

Sloane Stephens d. Diane Parry; 6-2, 6-3


Recap of day 6

Gauff reached her first Grand Slam quarter-final at the French Open last year, which remains her best singles finish at a major, and now she is one victory away from matching that feat.

The 18-year-old Atlanta native reached the fourth round without dropping a set, and she was very effective in Friday’s win over Kanepi. She recorded just 13 unforced errors, 16 less than her Estonian counterpart, and recorded 20 winners.

“I knew going into it it was going to be a tough game,” Gauff said. said. “I’ve been coming to France since I was 10, so I think that’s helped me a lot. I guess that makes me a clay court – I don’t mean a specialist, but, you know, well to this.”

Roland Garros @Roland Garros

That fourth round smile 😁😁😁@CocoGauff returns to the second week to #Roland Garros with a 6-3 6-4 win over Kaia Kanepi. pic.twitter.com/oMdZSLx3Hk

Defending tournament champion and No. 1 seed Djokovic continued to roll in the men’s group with his straight-set triumph over Bedene.

The 20-time Grand Slam champion won 85% of the points on his first serve and compiled excellent ratios for aces on double faults (9-1) and winners on unforced errors (30-18). He added five breaks of serve in a mostly drama-free victory.

His draw starts to get a lot tougher, starting with Schwartzman in the fourth round.

Roland Garros @Roland Garros

Smooth navigation ⛵@DjokerNole is in his 13th consecutive fourth round at #Roland Garros beating Bedene 6-3, 6-3 6-2. pic.twitter.com/wVOz9Brcfm

Nadal also continued to come through the early rounds with a victory over Van de Zandschulp.

The clay king’s defensive prowess was once again on full display as he finished with just 13 unforced errors. He won 48% of the points on the return and had six breaks of serve.

It is the 17th time that Nadal has reached at least the fourth round of Roland-Garros in 18 appearances. The only exception came in 2016 when he was forced to forfeit after the second round due to injury.

Azarenka became the last major champion knocked out of the women’s draw thanks to an impressive comeback from Teichmann.

The 24-year-old Swiss southpaw had already set a new career high by reaching the third round of a Grand Slam, and the triumph over the two-time Australian Open champion was her last marquee victory as part of a 2022 season in small groups.

It wasn’t the cleanest match as they combined for 101 unforced errors, but Teichmann managed to take control with 44 winners over the last two sets.

Zverev was not at his best on Friday, tallying 50 unforced errors and converting just two of his seven break point chances, but he still managed to get past Nakashima in three tight sets.

The No.3 seed has been overshadowed given the strength of the top half of the group, but he still has the potential to play the spoiler role if he can cut down on mistakes in the future.

Roland Garros @Roland Garros

The roar of victory 🦁@AlexZverev defeated Brandon Nakashima 7-6(2), 6-3, 7-6(5) to advance to the fourth round for the fifth consecutive year.#Roland Garros < a href="https://t.co/fHFiaLIQqW">pic.twitter.com/fHFiaLIQqW

The third round should end on Saturday in Paris.

]]> WRITE ABOUT: closing the loop on water | Opinion https://sailtheory.com/write-about-closing-the-loop-on-water-opinion/ Fri, 27 May 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/write-about-closing-the-loop-on-water-opinion/ When I was 10, my mother bought me a 14-foot aluminum rowboat. She, my younger sister and I had just moved from Brooklyn to live upstate with my grandmother on the shores of Lake Chautauqua. My mother thought a boat would be safer than having me cycle the narrow roads of Lakewood village. Bless his […]]]>

When I was 10, my mother bought me a 14-foot aluminum rowboat. She, my younger sister and I had just moved from Brooklyn to live upstate with my grandmother on the shores of Lake Chautauqua. My mother thought a boat would be safer than having me cycle the narrow roads of Lakewood village.

Bless his generous heart and for his lack of understanding of boats.

Going from an urban childhood in Brooklyn to a semi-rural life in Lakewood was a culture shock on every level. Instead of buses, subways, streams of traffic, and crowded sidewalks, there was peace and quiet — and eventually, my own boat docked at a dock 100 feet from my front door, bobbing in the waves.

This aluminum boat was the first link in a chain of ships over the decades that included several fast runabouts, a mahogany cabin cruiser, 11 sailboats (ranging from an 8ft to a 48ft ocean sloop) and the “Spirit of Louise”, a pontoon boat named for my late mother-in-law, Louise Beardslee Schwartz.

The “Spirit” was moored at the family cottage in Valois and skimmed Seneca Lake for over a decade, sailing from Watkins Glen to the North Shores, stopping at Village Marina, Miles Winery, the Showboat and many other ports stopover.

This week my nautical circle was completed with the purchase of a classic Oregon-style aluminum fishing runabout. It’s a sporty descendant of my original Lakewood boat, nicknamed “Mike’s Tin Can” by my friends and neighbors.

In honor of this moniker, this latest boat has been dubbed “Tynn Man”, a nod to my first ship and the name of a key character in my ongoing novel.

As soon as the news of Tynn Man’s purchase reached Hector, I started getting excited updates from people getting their boats ready for the summer. The Finger Lakes recent spurt of warm weather has people ready to splash out.

Those who have kept their boats in the lifts all winter are already circulating photos of them on the water, delighted with the start of the boating season.

I understand. Even as a young teenager, my boat was the first to enter the lake each spring and the last to come out in the fall in my neighborhood.

Adventures and misadventures abounded.

A memorable spring, my teenage friends and I put it in the water too soon, while the pack ice was still floating on Chautauqua Lake. As only big teenage brains would, we used the aluminum boat as an icebreaker, ramming through what we thought was ice thin enough to crash into.

But this not-so-intelligent experiment turned out to be a good learning experience. We had to surreptitiously repair a handful of popped rivets in the hull of the boat.

Another time, my cousin and I rigged a mast and sailed the boat, speeding across Chautauqua Lake in a stiff offshore breeze. We had lightened the boat for the trip by removing the outboard motor, anchor and other equipment.

Fortunately, we had kept the oars on board. This turned out to be fortuitous, as we did not understand the physics of sailing upwind. And so we rowed for what felt like an eternity, pushing straight into the wind to get home.

All of those memories resurfaced as I gaze out my home office window at a tributary of the Willamette River, where Tynn Man is leisurely floating along the deck/dock of my riverside home, just like my first boat. It’s so similar to what I saw every Spring-Summer-Fall day in Lakewood growing up that when I board Tynn Man, I can almost hear my mother’s voice yelling at me, “Michael!” Do you have your life jacket?

]]> Career in the Merchant Navy https://sailtheory.com/career-in-the-merchant-navy/ Wed, 25 May 2022 07:41:00 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/career-in-the-merchant-navy/ Travel the world and learn to overcome complex challenges while traveling in the Merchant Navy Travel the world and learn to overcome complex challenges while traveling in the Merchant Navy The shipping industry generates a myriad of career opportunities each year, with a recent report suggesting that the employment rate will grow by 12% through […]]]>

Travel the world and learn to overcome complex challenges while traveling in the Merchant Navy

Travel the world and learn to overcome complex challenges while traveling in the Merchant Navy

The shipping industry generates a myriad of career opportunities each year, with a recent report suggesting that the employment rate will grow by 12% through 2026. Global trade continues to see a slight increase after the pandemic, and with the merchant navy, emerges as a field with the possibility of experimentation and career development. The need for qualified officers is also increasing globally.

Students can work as naval architects, deck officers, and marine engineers and undertake a variety of tasks such as designing and building ships, loading and unloading cargo, maintaining ship’s mechanical equipment, and researching solutions to overcome various problems.

Qualifications

Students wishing to enter the Merchant Marine field must have passed their Class 12 examinations in Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics. They will also need to be able to swim or dive and master basic math, physics and marine concepts. Other skills required include design, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, time management and active learning. As in any other industry, effective written and oral communication skills, knowledge of different cultures and languages ​​as well as team spirit and team coordination are important.

In college, students will learn various concepts in marine engineering, seamanship, and navigation, among other practical skills. Studying nautical science and marine engineering is necessary to understand how the industry works and to tap into the many roles that shipping companies are now looking to hire.

Nautical science deals with naval oceanography, navigation in inland waters and at sea, and various cargo handling procedures throughout the merchant marine fleet, while marine engineering studies construction and maintenance ships and other sailboats.

Many universities also have a ‘ship-in-campus’, which is a fully operational replica of a ship’s engine room that allows students to be trained in a hands-on way, to get a feel for real-world operations on board. .

The shipping industry not only offers a high-paying position, but also allows its officers to travel the world, work with national and multinational companies, and learn to meet complex challenges on the go.

The Author is Principal, Maharashtra Institute of Naval Education & Training, Pune (MANET), MITADT University

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“It requires a lot of flexibility and problem solving” https://sailtheory.com/it-requires-a-lot-of-flexibility-and-problem-solving/ Mon, 23 May 2022 16:34:00 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/it-requires-a-lot-of-flexibility-and-problem-solving/ May 23 – Shannon Berry, an emergency physician at Columbia Memorial Hospital in Astoria, wonders if she could become a doctor. She was fascinated by physics and astronomy but realized in college that these fields were not very social. As a scientist, she wanted to work with human beings rather than in the laboratory. At […]]]>

May 23 – Shannon Berry, an emergency physician at Columbia Memorial Hospital in Astoria, wonders if she could become a doctor.

She was fascinated by physics and astronomy but realized in college that these fields were not very social. As a scientist, she wanted to work with human beings rather than in the laboratory.

At the University of Washington, she applied to both nursing school, nurse practitioner school, and medical school, feeling the latter was out of reach.

“I doubted myself a lot,” Berry recalls.

She was accepted into all three programs.

After UW, Berry completed an emergency medicine residency at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital, which now employs her at Columbia Memorial. She joined the small critical-access hospital in 2017, commuting from southeast Portland until she and her husband moved to Astoria in 2019.

Berry is also the medical director of the Medix Ambulance Service, where she oversees staff training, reviews medical cases and develops protocols.

Before medical school, she wanted to be an obstetrician-gynecologist. Her goal was to open a birth center.

But the emergencies, the diversity of the patients and their conditions, called him.

“I grew up quite poor and without health insurance,” she said, “and so it really meant a lot to me to be able to treat people from all walks of life, regardless of their ability to pay.”

In the emergency room, Barry treats people suffering from medical emergencies, mental health crises and traumatic injuries. From people suffering from heart attacks and strokes, to psychotic or suicidal thoughts, to the fallout from car accidents, Berry and his colleagues see everyone who walks through the door.

“You have to know a bit of everything,” she says.

Even without a pandemic adding pressure on hospital staff, ERs face complex social issues – such as the effects of homelessness and intoxication – that seem to take longer and longer. staff resources.

People at the end of life—those who cannot care for themselves at home and have no one to watch over them—often don’t know where to turn. There is nothing imminently wrong with them, but they live with the threat of something happening – a fall, an inability to feed or go to the bathroom – after they come out.

Berry worries about them when they leave.

“I try my best to solve these problems, and often I just feel ineffective and a little helpless, and I want to help, but I just can’t because of the constraints of the health system,” she said. declared.

Despite the challenges, Berry loves her job – the collaborative environment, the team approach, the interactions with her patients. “It requires a lot of flexibility and problem solving, and those are skills that really interest me, that make the job very interesting,” she said.

Originally from Virginia, Berry is a world traveler, foodie tourist and a “Northwest action figure type”, she said – a skier, hiker, cyclist and outdoor enthusiast .

Berry wants to get into sailing, fishing and crabbing. She is less interested in surfing because of the shark injuries she sees in the ER.

She also plays soccer and wonders why there is no women’s soccer league on the north coast. “I think trying to figure out if we can make it happen,” she said.

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‘Email From the Future’ imagines a world without ultra-rich tech https://sailtheory.com/email-from-the-future-imagines-a-world-without-ultra-rich-tech/ Sat, 21 May 2022 16:13:00 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/email-from-the-future-imagines-a-world-without-ultra-rich-tech/ “Email From the Future” presents a scenario for the world in 2084. (Illustration by TierneyMJ/Bigstock) Visions of utopia date back to the year 1516, when Thomas More literally wrote the book about it – but is it an outdated idea to envision a world where today’s biggest problems are solved? Michael Rogers, who presents himself […]]]>
“Email From the Future” presents a scenario for the world in 2084. (Illustration by TierneyMJ/Bigstock)

Visions of utopia date back to the year 1516, when Thomas More literally wrote the book about it – but is it an outdated idea to envision a world where today’s biggest problems are solved?

Michael Rogers, who presents himself as a “practical futurist”, does not think so. His day job is to present visions of the future to audiences ranging from startups to Boeing, Microsoft and other Fortune 500 companies. In a new book titled “Email of the future” it describes a future world of 2084 where ideas that may seem unworkable today end up dealing with climate change, wealth inequality, culture wars and other ills plaguing society today .

“Going forward is a bit like sailing upwind,” Rogers says in the latest episode of science fiction, a podcast that focuses on the intersection of science and fiction. “You have to go back and forth around the obstacles, but every once in a while you have to lift your head and look, and make sure you’re still going in the right direction.”

If Rogers’ vision comes to fruition, we expect a big course correction: its history includes measures to limit executive compensation, institute a tax on robots (first suggested by Bill Gates in 2017), zero carbon emissions by 2040 and create a climate repair fund. Along the way, the ultra-rich tech titans disappear as much as the titanosaurs.

“In my book, there’s an awareness specifically around climate change and the fact that it’s going to cost billions of dollars to fix the planet,” Rogers told me. “So there is again a great social change in which the ultra-rich no longer look like heroes. They actually look like people withholding resources that could save lives. »

“Email From the Future” doesn’t focus on the lifestyles of the rich and famous. The book is presented as a series of emails sent back from 2084 by a middle-class roboticist who enjoys a sci-fi time travel twist.

In classic utopian novels, the narrators encounter their Shangri-Las because their ship has derailed, or they have become lost in the jungle, or their plane has crashed in the Himalayas. “It was easy until we had a full globe, at which point you couldn’t do that anymore,” Rogers said. “We did time travel from the 19th century, so I needed that as a plot device.”

The novel’s narrator, named Aldus, discovers how to use quantum physics to deliver messages to Rogers’ email account. “Note that this is only at the quantum level,” Rogers said. “It only involves electrons, so I’m not asking too much here.”

In a series of emails, Alde tells his life story, beginning with his birth in 2010 and documenting the dramatic changes wrought by the climate challenge. In 2029, floods, storms and wildfires become so severe that the younger generation organizes a General strike a la Greta Thunberg – which compels world leaders to see the light.

Rogers does not consider this scenario to be mere science fiction.

“I think it will take a fundamental shift in humanity to deal with this threat, because it is a global threat,” he said. “And I suggest in the book that as the internet gets stronger and better at translating languages, we start to create more of a global mind. There will be a time when humans take a major spiritual shift and say, we we have to fix this planet. And I believe it will be the younger ones. I think Gen Z and their younger siblings are the heroes of my book.

Michael Rogers and “Email of the Future”. (Images via Practical Futurist)

Rogers manages to incorporate a wide range of futuristic technologies into its story. You’ll have to listen to the podcast for the full recap, but here’s a sample:

  • Digital twins: Scientists will discover how to combine genetic profiling and sensor data to develop a computer model for each person’s health. Your Double digital will be detailed enough to give advance warning of future medical problems, in time for healthcare providers to avoid them. “If, in 30 or 40 years, medical science doesn’t create digital twins for every patient, it will be a huge loss,” Rogers said.
  • Digital Tutors: Children will always receive personalized AI agents that guide them through the educational process and advise them throughout their training and career.
  • Tru ID: Each person will receive a credential profile cannot be hacked, and while it’s always possible to be anonymous, people should reveal their TruID in most digital interactions. “People will say in the future, ‘Why would you trust information from someone who hides their identity? ‘” Rogers said.
  • Genetic modification: Rogers’ book assumes that recombinant DNA technologies eliminate deadly sins like greed: “What makes this possible is the discovery that greed is actually a disease…much like alcoholism, or before it was epilepsy which was thought to be a moral defect. Now we know it’s the result of certain genes going bad. It will turn out that greed is the same thing.

Rogers’ vision for the future incorporates some controversial social policies. For example, universal basic income is a data. “If we don’t, we won’t have the kind of flexible workforce that we really need,” he said. “I think it also ties into the issue of automation and the fact that if we really automate a lot of society, we kind of become a lot richer as a society.”

A tax on robots would share this wealth.

“We may be running into a situation where the owners of the robots and the owners of the software — in other words, those who own the capital — actually get all the gains,” Rogers said. “And where does that leave the workers?”

Rogers took up Bill Gates’ suggestion that a tax could be levied on companies that manufacture and install robots, to replace the income tax that would have been paid by human workers.

“He meant this figuratively, but there had to be a way for the riches of total automation to be recycled back into society rather than into the pockets of the ultra-rich,” Rogers said.

Another way to curb the ultra-rich would be to limit executive compensation. In Rogers’ book, total compensation for management types cannot exceed 20 times an employee’s average salary. (In comparison, Equilar reports that the median CEO compensation ratio for the 500 largest U.S. public companies was 245 against 1 in 2021.)

Not everyone would consider the fictional world of Rogers a utopia. The ultra-rich and those aspiring to become ultra-rich may feel particularly threatened. But Rogers sees his world as the one he would like to live in.

“Just the notion of a more equal society where technology works not to create winners and losers, but to make everyone their best self – that, to me, is very appealing,” he said. .

Check original version of this article on Cosmic Log for Michael Rogers’ perspective on the spirituality of the future, plus a bonus book recommendation from Cosmic Log Used Book Club. Stay tuned for the next episodes of the science fiction podcast Going through Anchor, Apple, Google, Covered, Spotify, Breaker, Pocket casts, public radio and Reason. If you like Fiction Science, please rate the podcast and subscribe to receive alerts for upcoming episodes.

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