high school – Sail Theory http://sailtheory.com/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 18:53:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sailtheory.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T011712.182-150x150.png high school – Sail Theory http://sailtheory.com/ 32 32 Milan John Vano, 89, wild https://sailtheory.com/milan-john-vano-89-wild/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 18:15:22 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/milan-john-vano-89-wild/ September 17, 1932 – March 14, 2022 The funeral service for Milan John Vano, 89, will be held at 10:30 a.m., Friday, March 18, 2022, at Ascension Lutheran Church in Burnsville, MN. It will be preceded by a visit from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at the church. Pastor Joel Vano will officiate, followed by […]]]>

September 17, 1932 – March 14, 2022

The funeral service for Milan John Vano, 89, will be held at 10:30 a.m., Friday, March 18, 2022, at Ascension Lutheran Church in Burnsville, MN. It will be preceded by a visit from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at the church. Pastor Joel Vano will officiate, followed by interment at 3:30 p.m. at Trinity Cemetery in Long Prairie. Arrangements have been entrusted to Williams Dingmann Funeral Home in Long Prairie.

Milan died March 14 at his home in Savage, MN. He was born on September 17, 1932 to John and Maria (Kubik) Vano in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from Washburn High School in Minneapolis and later attended Concordia College first in St. Paul and then in River Forest, Illinois, where he earned his bachelor’s degree. His first teaching job was in Mayville, WI. While teaching there, he received a call from Trinity Lutheran School. Accepting the teaching job at Long Prairie allowed him to meet the love of his life, Gloria Sadlovsky. When Gloria moved to St. Paul to attend business school, Milan took on a new teaching job to be closer to her. They were married at Trinity Lutheran Church on June 7, 1959. Their honeymoon was a three-month adventure filled with hiking and camping across Europe. New teaching opportunities brought them to Grand Junction, CO and Sparta, WI. Milan then completed her Masters in Art Education at the University of Wisconsin-Higher. After moving to Prescott, they were blessed with two children, Joel and Dawnelle. The remaining time of his 35-year career was spent teaching art in Hastings public schools. In 1976 he received the Teacher of the Year award before retiring in 1992.

He shared his artistic gifts through painting, drawing, sculpture and stained glass design. Her love for nature manifested itself in hiking, biking, cross-country skiing and sailing. He loved to travel, which often included camping in national parks across the United States. One of his favorite hobbies was flying homemade radio-controlled gliders. The accordion and harmonica were his instruments of choice in his musical ministry at various events and health centers.

Milan was anchored by a strong Christian faith, and it showed in the way he lived his life. With humility, patience and humour, Milan was able to share these talents with many people. He seizes every opportunity to be close to those who are dearest to him. He made it a priority to share his time and love with his family and friends. It brought him great joy and left each of them with many special memories and a lasting example of what it means to be devoted to Jesus. Milan wanted everyone to have the sure hope of believing in Jesus. As Jesus said, “I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will live” (John 11:25).

Milan is survived by his wife, Gloria; son, Joel (Judy) of Savage, MN; daughter, Dawnelle (Lee Nesbitt) Engesser of Prescott, WI; Joseph Engesser of Red Wing, MN; brothers, Andrew (Sally) of Carlos, MN and Joseph (Shirley) of Rapid City, SD; grandchildren, Jared, Kyle (Wendy) and Ryan Engesser, Jessica (Nicholas) Anderson; Jordan (Paige) Vano and her great-grandchildren, Soteria, Josiah and Ezekiel Anderson.

He is predeceased by his parents, John and Maria Vano.

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First Fed gives Northwest Maritime Center $1 million to expand access https://sailtheory.com/first-fed-gives-northwest-maritime-center-1-million-to-expand-access/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 17:41:00 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/first-fed-gives-northwest-maritime-center-1-million-to-expand-access/ The Northwest Maritime Center (NWMC) in Port Townsend is a celebration of maritime culture, dedicated to engaging people through powerful maritime experiences and supporting the maritime industry. Jefferson County is one of the strongest maritime anchors in the state, providing a crucial part of the local economy and culture. First Fed announced a $1 million […]]]>

The Northwest Maritime Center (NWMC) in Port Townsend is a celebration of maritime culture, dedicated to engaging people through powerful maritime experiences and supporting the maritime industry. Jefferson County is one of the strongest maritime anchors in the state, providing a crucial part of the local economy and culture.

First Fed announced a $1 million donation to NWMC to expand access to maritime education. Funding will be evenly distributed over 10 years.

“The maritime industry is vital for our region. First Fed is dedicated to helping the Northwest Maritime Center achieve its goal of doubling the number of program participants by 2025,” said Matt Deines, President and CEO of First Fed. The NWMC served 2,950 program participants in 2019 and expects to reach 6,000 per year by 2025.

The shipping industry is Washington’s third-largest economic engine with jobs paying an average of $82,800 a year. In Jefferson County alone, the industry provides more than 2,300 jobs, or one in five, according to a 2018 economic impact study. However, the industry is experiencing labor shortages due to job departures. retired sailors. A labor shortage of 150,000 seafarers is predicted by 2025 as the sector continues to grow at an average of 6.4% per year.

The programs offered by the NWMC strive to help fill this gap with hands-on, project-based learning focused on the environment, marine science, and maritime careers. Emphasis is placed on youth programs so that students have multiple exposures to maritime culture and potential career paths in the industry.

In Jefferson County, NWMC offers week-long immersive maritime discovery programs to all seventh graders. Students study science through local weather and wildlife; mathematics through the use of nautical charts and plotting lessons; engineering through boat building; social studies through cartography and historical research; language arts through maritime nomenclature and poetry; and art through illustrations of native species. Hands-on activities such as the USCG Damage Control Simulator challenge students to find ways to handle flooding scenarios and learn how to operate a sump pump.

Students interested in pursuing maritime studies can apply to Port Townsend Maritime Academy which offers a one-year maritime program taught by professional sailors and educators. According to Beattie, over 30% of students who have attended Port Townsend Maritime Academy have gone on to either direct employment in the maritime industry or further maritime studies.

Port Townsend Maritime Academy was one of the inspirations for Maritime High School in the Highline School District. Maritime High School will have its first class in 2022. Participation in programs like these will stimulate interest in maritime careers and promote sustainability in the industry.

“At its core, the Maritime Center aims to connect people to powerful opportunities on the water, whether for recreation, personal growth or employment,” explained Jake Beattie, Executive Director of NWMC. “We also intentionally focus on diversity in our programs to authentically represent the Pacific Northwest communities we serve.”

Although students are a big priority, the NWMC supports a range of community events like She Tells Sea Tales which celebrates women in the maritime industry. They are also well known for the Wooden Boat Festival, the flagship event that inspired the Wooden Boat Foundation which was founded in 1978, later becoming the Northwest Maritime Centre.

“Northwest Maritime Center appreciates the strong support of First Fed, our local community bank on the peninsula,” Beattie said. “Over the years, First Fed has demonstrated its commitment to maritime culture through sponsorships, volunteerism and participation in our community events.”

“We love having the Northwest Maritime Center here in Port Townsend,” said Luxmi Love, First Fed Branch Manager in Port Townsend. “Their programs and events bring a lot of value and inspiration to our community. Our team loves to volunteer and support their efforts.

The North West Maritime Center offers a range of maritime courses where people of virtually any age or level of experience can find a program to enjoy. Sign up for their newsletters or learn more about NWMC programs and events on their website at nwmaritime.org.

First Fed is a member of the FDIC and an equal housing lender.

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Leon students stage walkout to protest LGBTQ teachings bill and parent notification https://sailtheory.com/leon-students-stage-walkout-to-protest-lgbtq-teachings-bill-and-parent-notification/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 00:04:00 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/leon-students-stage-walkout-to-protest-lgbtq-teachings-bill-and-parent-notification/ Leon County school students walked out of class today to protest the so-called ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill ahead of a scheduled vote in the state Senate. Students carried signs and chanted outside the entrances to the Senate Chambers and the Florida House. Shayla Sheppard is a sophomore at Sail High School. Shayla Sheppard was dropped […]]]>

Leon County school students walked out of class today to protest the so-called ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill ahead of a scheduled vote in the state Senate.

Students carried signs and chanted outside the entrances to the Senate Chambers and the Florida House.

Shayla Sheppard is a sophomore at Sail High School. Shayla Sheppard was dropped off at the Capitol by her mother and joined the protest alongside her girlfriend.

“I feel like they [students] should be able to express who they want to be and often the reason they express it at school is that it’s hard at home because parents don’t understand or because they don’t accept who they [kids] are.”

If the legislation were to become law, student requests to use different names or pronouns at school would require parental notification, regardless of the student’s wishes. There is no current requirement for schools to notify parents if a student requests that parents not be notified.

The bill also prohibits teaching about gender identity or sexual orientation in kindergarten through grade 3 or if the teaching is not age-appropriate according to standards that the Department of Education State education would create. Proponents of the bill say parents have a right to know and that schools should not withhold information about a child’s medical condition. At a recent House hearing, six Republicans crossed party lines to oppose it. The Senate resumes the measure on Monday.

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Alumna preserving the past while creating her own legacy | UGM News https://sailtheory.com/alumna-preserving-the-past-while-creating-her-own-legacy-ugm-news/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 18:29:21 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/alumna-preserving-the-past-while-creating-her-own-legacy-ugm-news/ Contact: Deanne PucaFebruary 21, 2022 February is Black History Month, an annual celebration of achievement and a time to recognize the important role black history plays in the history of the United States and the West. This month, the University celebrates Bronco alumni who have inspired change, pushed boundaries and paved the way for so […]]]>

Contact: Deanne Puca

February is Black History Month, an annual celebration of achievement and a time to recognize the important role black history plays in the history of the United States and the West. This month, the University celebrates Bronco alumni who have inspired change, pushed boundaries and paved the way for so many more.

KALAMAZOO, Mich.—As a journalist, author, and mentor, Sonya Bernard Hollins chronicled and channeled the spirit of the pioneer Dr Merze Tate while becoming a role model for young people in her own right.

Sonya Bernard Hollins

Alumnus of Western Michigan University, Bernard-Hollins learned about Tate’s story nearly 20 years ago while considering story ideas about African-American premieres at WMU. The Kalamazoo Gazette reporter was immediately drawn to Tate’s story as a pioneer in education and inspiration to young students of color as the first black woman to receive a bachelor’s degree from Western, which recently named its newest college in his honor, in 1927.

Her extraordinary life experience “grabbed me and didn’t let go,” says Bernard-Hollins. During her research, she became fascinated with a travel club Tate started when she was the first history teacher at Crispus Attucks High School in Indianapolis, a school established in 1927 by the Ku Klux Klan to segregate students blacks from their white peers. In 2008, Bernard-Hollins started her own travel club for young girls, now called Merze Tate Explorers.

Tate’s travel club of more than 40 students visited Washington in 1932. The teacher created an experience of train rides, hotel stays, and visits to the White House, U.S. Treasury, and National Cemetery of Arlington. For many Tate students, it was their first exposure to a world outside their own; this type of experience is still important and empowering for young black people today, according to Bernard-Hollins.

“Merze Tate knew the importance of exposing these children to the larger world and saw the importance of education and the role it played in civil rights,” says Bernard-Hollins. “Tate believed that if you have an education and skills, you have something to offer. If you have something people want or need, you have power. And having power breaks down barriers .”

Bernard-Hollins has the same hopes for girls in grades 9 through 12 who participate in her Exploration Program, which helps girls share their experiences through the media, especially their quarterly publication Girls Can! magazine. Over the years, the Merze Tate Explorers have interviewed women leaders, visited Fortune 500 companies, traveled internationally, and explored academic and professional opportunities.

“I want to help young women not only explore other possibilities, but have conversations about racism, mental health, salary negotiation, financial literacy and more, so young people aren’t caught off guard. when they go out into the world. We teach them what many call ‘soft skills’, which are invaluable in all areas of life.”

Bernard-Hollins and the Merze Tate Explorers at a ceremony naming Western’s new college after Tate, the first black woman to receive a bachelor’s degree from Western in 1927.

Besides the travel club, Bernard-Hollins promotes Tate’s experiences as curator of the traveling photo exhibit, “The World Through the Lens of Merze Tate,” which opened at the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame. in Lansing, Michigan, in February 2011. And in 2019, she wrote a children’s biography, “Small Beginnings: The Photographic Journey Through the Life of Merze Tate.”

“I wanted Merze Tate to be the inspiration for these young girls that she was for me,” she says. “Knowing more about her and what she’s been through gives you that power, that fire, and that determination to break down those barriers.”

While Bernard-Hollins became a champion of Tate’s life, his own extraordinary story is a testament to that legacy. She grew up in a single parent family and was a single mother herself at 21. As a young mother, she says people drew conclusions about her life based on her race and gender.

“It’s humiliating and demeaning when people don’t see you for your potential, but they see you for your situation,” she says, noting that although her life is separated from Tate by three generations, there are still racial barriers to break down in the 21st century.

Continuing his own legacy

Bernard-Hollins attended Kalamazoo Valley Community College before earning a bachelor’s degree from Western in 1993. She persevered on his way, while challenging himself, to become a journalist. For more than 20 years, she has worked as a professional journalist in daily and weekly newspapers as well as a freelance writer for local, regional and national magazines.

During her years as a journalist, she says she was often entrusted with stories about the African-American community, paid less than her white colleagues and not supported by her colleagues because she excelled as a writer. Although she got caught up in the stereotype that only a black journalist could write about the black community, it was a job she did with pride. “I at least knew these stories were being written and covered with dignity in the media,” she concluded.

Bernard-Hollins has won awards for her writing from the Michigan Press Association, the Associated Press of Michigan, and others. Additionally, she has been recognized for her professional and community service in the Kalamazoo area, serving as a member and board member of various organizations in Kalamazoo and Battle Creek.

She is the author of the book “Here I Stand: A Musical History of African Americans in Battle Creek, Michigan”, and is also a playwright, contributing to Von Washington’s recent production “My Heart Belongs to You, Kalamazoo”. Bernard-Hollins is also often sought out for his help with local history and presentation book projects throughout Michigan and is currently the editor and publisher of the online and print magazine Community Voices, as well as helping to edit and advising others to self-publish their own publications and books. .

The mother-of-four says her passion for Tate’s legacy and passing on its history and experiences to future generations, particularly through the Merze Tate Explorers, has been a driving force in her career as well as in his personal character and his growth.

“Merze Tate was like a role model that I used to create experiences for these girls. Even though I never met her, I thought to myself, ‘How can I bring her confidence in the face of gender and racial prejudice, to the world’s travel experiences and passion to learn to live through me?” Her story is what inspires me and what I use to inspire young girls,” she says. “I, for one, want to keep Tate’s legacy alive, and I want to be someone she’s proud of.”

For more WMU news, arts and eventsvisit WMU News online.

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Homer Merch | Obituaries | The Tribune of Meadville https://sailtheory.com/homer-merch-obituaries-the-tribune-of-meadville/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 00:24:44 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/homer-merch-obituaries-the-tribune-of-meadville/ Homer Merchon January 21, 1931 – January 28, 2022 Originally from County Crawford, Homer Malcolm Mershon, born January 21, 1931, has always looked to horizons beyond his agrarian roots. The local two-room schoolhouse in Dicksonburg gave her plenty of opportunities to explore geography and math, as well as learn and teach other students more fluidly […]]]>

January 21, 1931
January 28, 2022

Originally from County Crawford, Homer Malcolm Mershon, born January 21, 1931, has always looked to horizons beyond his agrarian roots. The local two-room schoolhouse in Dicksonburg gave her plenty of opportunities to explore geography and math, as well as learn and teach other students more fluidly than at a conventional school.
This duality of learning and teaching shaped the trajectory of Homer’s life, providing him with surprising opportunities. From Conneaut Valley High School and Erie Business College, to the Bulgarian program at the Army Language School, and a bachelor’s degree in foreign service from Georgetown University in 1958, Homer continually explored new disciplines, including physics. and quantum mechanics. He studied linguistic transcription at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and acquired skills in Russian at two universities in Paris where trilingual professors helped him discover his theory of language: “the centrality of the core of the circle of ‘where language shines’.
Shortly after returning to the United States in 1962, Homer was seriously injured in a car accident. He recovered to teach French and Russian at Linesville High School from 1963-65. When he enrolled at Edinboro State College for summer studies, the College asked him to teach French language and culture.
During his 35-year career at Edinboro, Homer constantly expanded his education. He received a master’s degree in French language and literature from UMass and won a National Defense Education Act language scholarship to Rice University. His Russian certificate from Leningrad University in 1985 helped him revitalize Edinboro’s Russian curriculum. The highlight of his 1988-89 sabbatical year was performing during his family’s month-long peace march through the USSR and Ukraine with 500 English-speaking and Soviet people of various ages. Almost every semester from 1990 to 2000, he rewrote new language teaching ideas in his French and Russian course guides. Students remember him as an easy-going tutor and mentor with a “punny” sense of humor and a murder mystery in his pocket.
Homer enjoyed 21 successful years after retirement, during which he read, wrote, and spoke about language production and language acquisition. Drawn to history, he found the Mershon genealogy fascinating. Homer fulfilled his travel dreams by visiting his son in Mali, sailing along the Egyptian Nile, and serving as a guide and interpreter for a friend on the Trans-Siberian Railway from Mongolia to Moscow. He celebrated his 80th birthday by visiting northern China, practicing the Chinese he had learned in Edinboro. Particularly proud of his poultry, vegetables and flowers, Homer continued to garden and farm full time, even though cancer slowed him down. He thanked Dr. Pasricha and the Barco Center staff for their care. On January 28, 2022, he slipped away peacefully at home.
Homer is survived by Clémence Ravaçon Mershon, his language collaborator wife of 46 years, their son André Mershon (Kristin O’Planick) and their grandchildren Alexander and Vivienne Mershon, and their daughter Claire-Hélène Mershon (Paul Hibbert). Other survivors include sisters-in-law Joyce Mershon and Judy Mershon, numerous cousins, nieces and nephews.
He was survived by his parents Ronald and Georgia Stanford Mershon and his siblings Millard, Geraldine, Helen, John. Homer’s life will be celebrated later, as always the teacher, his body resides at the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine. Memorial donations may be made to the Student Hardship Fund, Edinboro University Advancement Office, 210 Meadville St., Edinboro, PA 16444
Arrangements are in the care of MCCAULEY FUNERAL HOME, 1405 Main St. Conneautville, PA 16406.
Online condolences can be left for the family at www.mccauleyfuneralhome.net

Published on February 18, 2022

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Maryland lawmakers are dragging their feet, turning their state into a destination for child brides https://sailtheory.com/maryland-lawmakers-are-dragging-their-feet-turning-their-state-into-a-destination-for-child-brides/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 19:20:13 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/maryland-lawmakers-are-dragging-their-feet-turning-their-state-into-a-destination-for-child-brides/ They came from all over the country to get married in the Free State: Ohio (16 and 36) West Virginia (16 and 30) The story continues under the ad In the past five years, some have even come from Alaska (17 and 19) to marry under the archaic laws of Maryland. The wedding tourists arrived […]]]>

They came from all over the country to get married in the Free State:

Ohio (16 and 36)

West Virginia (16 and 30)

In the past five years, some have even come from Alaska (17 and 19) to marry under the archaic laws of Maryland. The wedding tourists arrived as the rest of the nation began to tighten laws and raise the legal age at which someone can say ‘yes’.

Poyer imagines his own children when they were so young and is frustrated that in most underage marriages statewide clerks like him rarely see the two people marry.

“We don’t even have to check IDs,” Poyer said. The law states that only one person must appear before the clerk to obtain the marriage license. Once the marriage takes place – it could be at the courthouse, on the beach, in church, in a zoo, anywhere – the marriage certificate is issued and it is valid in all 50 states.

Marriage tourism is not new here. Free-wheeling, no-wait state demands made it the capital of elopements a century ago, especially in Elkton, the small border town closest to Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York. The Vegas of the East. Elkton was to marriage what Reno was to divorce.

Katherine Hepburn and Cary Grant went there in ‘The Philadelphia Story’, a chess champion and princess did in 1938 and Willie Mays and Margherite Wendell Chapman had their speedy wedding in Elkton in 1956. They were all smiling in their pictures.

“Courage, this is going to be the best day of your life,” one of the clerks in the basement of the Elkton courthouse told a 16-year-old blonde-haired, blue-eyed girl from Delaware, named Skyler, when she started crying. her wedding in February to a man twice her age in 2009.

“Wipe their tears away,” Skyler recalls the clerk recalling. Still in her twenties and trying to live a new life, she testified before lawmakers in 2016 to stop others from going through what she endured.

In his frequent testimony before state legislators — this is the seventh year they’ve been involved — Poyer points out that there are virtually no safeguards in Maryland law to protect children who do not want to marry. “The wedding ceremony itself can be performed by virtually anyone. Anyone can be ordained to perform a wedding in Maryland, it takes about five minutes and costs $29.99.

Over the past decade the nation has come to realize that it is perfectly legal for a 15 year old to marry a 40 year old man in most of our states.

State records show that at least 300,000 minors were married in the United States between 2000 and 2018, according to the Tahirih Justice Center, an advocacy group that was formed to help immigrants who fled to the United States. United to escape a forced marriage in their country of origin.

Since 2018, six states have raised the minimum age of marriage to 18, with no exceptions.

Rightly so, they should. You have to be 18 to vote, join the military, buy spray paint, pornography, and cigarettes (in some states), open a credit card, or work full-time. You must also be 18 to file for divorce and register with a domestic violence shelter.

I have a 15 year old boy, he is still working putting the dirty clothes in the hamper. But in Maryland, he could be a husband.

A 16 or 17 year old can marry under one of two conditions: parental consent or pregnancy. 15-year-olds who are both pregnant and have their parents’ blessing (only requires one parent) can get married.

“Only four states – four states – have [the pregnancy exception]“said Casey Carter Swegman, director of public policy at the Tahirih Justice Center and a native of Maryland, appalled by the stance his home state has taken on this. “And Maryland is one of them.”

The Blue Crab State, which has voted blue in every presidential election since 1988, is keeping company with Oklahoma, Arkansas and New Mexico on this.

But why is it so bad? Hasn’t our nation’s tradition been filled with high school sweethearts who get pregnant and do the honorable thing by going to the altar? Isn’t a “gun wedding” part of our cultural lexicon? We devoured TV shows about pregnant teenagers.

Married teenage mothers are twice as likely to live in poverty, 50% more likely to drop out of school, three times more likely to be victims of domestic violence. Nearly 80% of them divorce, said Maryland Senator Sarah K. Elfreth (D), lead sponsor of Senate Bill 29.

More dangerously, Swegman said, Maryland law can give pedophiles unfettered access to their victims. And these children are limited in their ability to get help because they don’t have the same legal rights as an adult. If the victim comes from a vulnerable family, the promise of a better life from a predatory adult may win them over.

Governor Larry Hogan (R) has been silent on the issue. He was the one who extended the summer school vacation past Labor Day to help the tourism industry. So I asked his office if he was concerned about the state becoming a destination for child marriages.

“If lawmakers are able to resolve their differences and get something on his desk, the governor will carefully consider the measure,” Hogan spokesman Michael Ricci said.

Bills to change that have been slamming around Annapolis for the past seven years, tossed from both sides of the aisle.

On the one hand, there are traditionalists like State Senator Chris West (R) who told a hearing last month that the “sticky wicket” on ending child marriage for him is a hypothetical couple, “a 17-year-old junior in high school and her 18-year-old boyfriend become sexually involved and she becomes pregnant, according to this bill there could be no marriage. You could almost hear the sounds of a 50s ballad and see West clenching his pearls when he said the child would be delivered out of wedlock.

On the other side, lawmakers are standing firm for a clear line at 18, no exceptions, rejecting amendments that allow emancipated minors aged 16 or 17 to marry. Or Senator Jill Carter (D), who said this month she was “ridden by the hypocrisy” of a bill that won’t let 17-year-olds marry while the system of criminal justice can try a 17 year old as an adult for certain crimes.

When introduced, Maryland was at the forefront of the revolution. It has since been left in the dust by Georgia, Utah, Florida and more than two dozen other states that have passed reform.

But on Valentine’s Day this week, the state senate reached a compromise and passed SR29, raising the age to 17 as long as the minor has parental approval or is pregnant. The compromise “represents the best balance we can find,” Elfreth said.

Of the. Vanessa E. Atterbeary (D) has introduced the bill year after year because, among other reasons, she is tired of hearing the stories of “girls marrying men who are 10, 15, 20 years their senior.”

The House is expected to vote on the bill this week. And Poyer remains hopeful. 18 would be better, he said, but he will be relieved not to have to worry about marrying 15 and 16 year olds.

These are not love stories. And it’s time for Maryland to grow.

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Meet Paly’s new physics teacher https://sailtheory.com/meet-palys-new-physics-teacher/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 04:23:23 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/meet-palys-new-physics-teacher/ Sun, surf and sea spray – the photo from a few years ago shows physics professor Thomas Peters enjoying the view of San Francisco Bay from his sailboat. With the wind in his hair and the sun in his face, Peters, recently hired to teach Palo Alto High School, finds the physics of sailing fascinating. […]]]>

Sun, surf and sea spray – the photo from a few years ago shows physics professor Thomas Peters enjoying the view of San Francisco Bay from his sailboat. With the wind in his hair and the sun in his face, Peters, recently hired to teach Palo Alto High School, finds the physics of sailing fascinating. Peters’ general interest in physics ranges from the complex aerodynamics of a sailing ship to simple classroom experiments.

Thomas Peters, professor of physics, supervises a group of H physics students who carry out a practical part of their test. Peters is keen to emphasize the day-to-day applications of content. “You could spend months studying the physics of cooking, you could spend a month studying the physics of sailing or the physics of music, because pretty much everything there is is based on physics and science. ” Peters said. (Photo: Sophia Yang)

Peters is a Bay Area native who grew up and lived in Campbell all his life. Prior to teaching at Paly, he completed a teacher preparation program at San Jose State University. Last year, Peters taught physics at Los Gatos High School as part of the prep program. Peters began teaching at the start of the semester after former physics professor Keith Geller retired.

In high school, Peters initially wanted to pursue a career as a music teacher after teaching music throughout middle school and high school. However, he ended up majoring in physics and engineering, a decision influenced by his interest in sailing.

“I walked out of my middle school music building and looked around and thought, well, now what?” Peters said. “At the time, the [2012 Cat Sailboat] races were going on, and I always thought sailing was great because of the amount of physics and engineering involved.

According to Peters, his passion for sailing led him to pursue a career in physics after previously taking a music-related path. The intricacies of aerodynamics and physics behind the structure of the sailboat interested him greatly.

“This [the 2012 Cat Sailboat Races] This was the first year they used the boiling boat system which has a piece that sticks underwater and lifts most of the boat out of the water,” Peters said. “There’s a lot less drag and it becomes a big physics problem.”

Growing up, Peters became interested in a variety of subjects, but teaching was always a path he wanted to take. He has experience in teaching different subjects.

Peters takes part in an afternoon sailing session on the bay. Outside of teaching, he enjoys regularly launching his Coronado-15 from Redwood City Corkscrew Slough. “I like to sail when I can get out,” Peters said. “It’s something I’ve always loved doing.” (Photo: Thomas Peters)

“I got it a year of high school physics experience, but I’ve been teaching other things for most of my life,” Peters said. “My first job in college was teaching sailing lessons and I’ve also been teaching the marching part of a marching band for about a dozen years now.”

According to Peters, there are aspects of the school that he is not used to, but he feels welcomed by both his students and his colleagues.

“The rest of the science department has been so wonderful and helped me figure things out,” Peters said. “My students were also helpful and understanding about the transition.”

Peters said he hopes to help students understand and share his love for the subject.

“I never studied physics in high school. I really wish I had it,” Peters said. “I have always found science to be one of the most rewarding subjects to study, simply because it is found in every other aspect of our lives.”

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Tillsonburg teenager needs life-saving surgery https://sailtheory.com/tillsonburg-teenager-needs-life-saving-surgery/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 14:31:34 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/tillsonburg-teenager-needs-life-saving-surgery/ Breadcrumb Links News Local News Publication date : February 09, 2022 • 33 minutes ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation Kaytlyn McKibbon. (Submitted) jpg, TN Content of the article Kaytlyn McKibbon, 14, of Tillsonburg, needs life-saving surgery for Bilateral Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (STO). Advertising This ad has not loaded yet, but your […]]]>

Content of the article

Kaytlyn McKibbon, 14, of Tillsonburg, needs life-saving surgery for Bilateral Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (STO).

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And she needs it this spring.

If the family can raise the money, the surgery will take place at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. It requires two major operations.

“The last few months it’s become critical,” Kaytlyn’s mother, Kim McKibbon, said.

It was Halloween 2021 when Kaytlyn started having difficulty breathing.

“That’s when she became addicted to oxygen,” Kim said.

“It started in the summer of 2020 when his left arm turned blue. They said it was a blood clot, which is unusual for a teenager. On Valentine’s Day (2021), it happened to her right arm. Last summer we thought she was having a heart attack and rushed her in. They found the clots had moved from her arms into her lungs.

“In October it was just unbearable, she couldn’t breathe without oxygen. If she is sitting, reading and not moving, she can take it off for about an hour. But if she gets up, she has to put it on.

Thoracic outlet syndrome is most common between the ages of 20 and 50.

“One in a million, ordinary people, can get it,” Kim said. “She was just unlucky.”

Kaytlyn, who graduated with honors from Westfield Public School last year, is currently attending Grade 9 at Glendale High School through an online program. She started in person last fall, but hasn’t been back since Halloween.

She is frequently hospitalized at London’s Children’s Hospital.

“Her hematologist referred her to all the vascular surgeons in the province who perform TOS,” Kim said.

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The first seven said no. Absolutely no. Too complicated.

“Normally TOS just pinches the nerve and occasionally pinches the vein, but his own pinches the nerve, the vein and the artery. So one wrong step in the surgery and you cut an artery and the patient can bleed. So the surgeons here say, ‘No, I don’t feel confident taking your case.’ That’s what we kept hearing from everyone.

They met with a surgeon in Toronto who only performs the procedure for adults. Waiting four years is not an option – she might not have years.

“We were lucky the blood clots went to his lungs (not his heart). It’s not good but it’s better than going to your brain. The risk of a heart attack or of stroke is really high.

If she raises her arms above her head, it completely clogs/blocks the blood vessels.

“If the blood doesn’t flow, it forms a clot.”

It makes simple tasks like brushing your hair and getting dressed difficult.

Her mother describes Kaytlyn as a dynamic, creative and active student whose life has been on hold for the past two years. She was an active member of the Tillsonburg Sea Scouts, and in healthier times enjoyed learning to sail, curl, swim, and camp. She enjoyed participating in drama and singing performances at school, at First Baptist and St. Paul’s United camps, and at the Tillsonburg Theater.

“Now to leave the house, one of us carries the portable oxygen for her and she walks beside us. She only goes out to go to doctor’s appointments.

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Kaytlyn spends her day with her loving dog by her side, Kim said, and dreams of getting back to a new normal, looks forward to seeing friends again, in-person school, singing again, taking walks and kayaking on Lisgar Lake.

The family has created a gofundme page at https://gofund.me/f6d485e2. On Monday, $21,809 of his $300,000 goal was raised.

This goal will match the estimated cost of surgery in Boston.

“Thoracic surgeon Dr (Dean) Donahue, all he does is thoracic outlet syndrome. Since the start of Covid, he has performed 300 surgeries for thoracic outlet syndrome.

Kaytlyn’s mother contacted their bank, remortgaged the house. His father has just sold his house and is getting a share of the capital.

They were told that the operation could take place by the end of April if they could increase the deposit.

“It’s still very expensive,” Kim said. “We need to raise at least $100,000. They have funding plans in hospitals in the United States, which is scary, but…”

Electronic transfer donations can also be sent directly to the McKibbon family via email (DonationForKaytlynM@outlook.com).

Part of the surgery will involve removing a rib. No longer pinched, most people are off blood thinners within a few months. Kaytlyn should continue to take blood thinners until the blood clots in her lungs dissolve.

“They also mentioned that they could do a balloon angioplasty, like they do for heart attack patients, and reinflate the vein because it’s so bent. But it can be done here in Canada. We spoke to a doctor in London who said: ‘Yes, if you can get a rib pulled out, I can pump up your vein.’

cabbott@postmedia.com

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Love Stories – The Martha’s Vineyard Times https://sailtheory.com/love-stories-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 20:47:45 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/love-stories-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ The Times asked some longtime island couples to share some of their top tips and some of their best moments together this Valentine’s Day. They all said they had enjoyed this trip in the past. Eileen and Tim Malyey Where and when did you meet? And what were your first impressions of each other?Tim replied: […]]]>

The Times asked some longtime island couples to share some of their top tips and some of their best moments together this Valentine’s Day. They all said they had enjoyed this trip in the past.

Eileen and Tim Malyey

Where and when did you meet? And what were your first impressions of each other?
Tim replied: We met on December 1, 1971, aboard SS Iberia’s last voyage from Vancouver, British Columbia, in transit to Australia, ₂ Re:. Part B, it was like at first sight.

You are invited to a dinner but you do not want to go. Who calls the host to cancel?
He says, “It’s women’s work. She says, “Tim doesn’t make phones.”

When was the last time you danced together and to what song?
It says: “Norman Mailer wrote ‘Tough Guys Don’t Dance’.” Eileen dances alone at her online exercise class.

Who does the cooking and what is your favorite thing they do?
Eileen cooks, Tim cleans. Favorites are dinners cooked by our close friends.

What’s the last thing you read aloud to each other?
Tim said “Probably a friend’s obituary.” Eileen says, “Probably something funny.”

Where did you go and what did you do on your first date?
Tim says: “Christmas 1971 in Double Bay, Sydney, in my apartment.” Eileen says: “Playing Quoits on Deck in the Howling North Pacific Wind, December 2, 1971”

Describe the best experience you have had together…
Tim says, “Spending the last half century together.” Eileen says, “Our trips when we had more energy, almost no money.”

Which of you is the first to ask for directions when you get lost?
Tim says, “Women’s work.

If you had the opportunity to have a second all-expenses-paid honeymoon, where would you go?
Tim says, “All expenses paid, huh?” Cronig’s. Eileen wants to stay home while he does his shopping.

What’s the best thing about being married or being with your long-term partner?
Tim says, “Exhaling with the feeling that I am walking away with something wonderful.” Eileen says, “All the comforts with no surprises.

Nancy Slonim Aronie and Joel Aronie

Where and when did you meet? And what were your first impressions of each other?
We met in 1965 on a blind date in Hartford, Connecticut. We had fun on the first date and we laughed a lot. We did songs with vocals.
He said he had never seen anything like me and I thought he was beautiful. But I wasn’t sure how smart he was because he said in a thick Boston accent, “You’re a hawt ticket,” and later he didn’t use the subjunctive. That must have been my criteria. Shortly after, I found his nuclear physics papers with A+.

You are invited to a dinner but you do not want to go. Who calls the host to cancel?
He never calls anyone, and we just end up going and having a good time.

When was the last time you danced together and to what song?
Yesterday. No music, we were singing:
“If you like sand dunes and salty air
quaint little houses here and there
You are sure to end up in old Cape Caaaa-od.

Who’s cooking and what’s your favorite thing they do?
Especially me. But lately, he’s been doing it. COVID was the catalyst, it makes eggplant parmigiana.

What’s the last thing you read aloud to yourself?
He’s reading my book club book, “Dirt Music” by Tim Winton, which I finished and loved. And I asked him to read what he had just finished reading so that I could be with him while he read.

Where did you go and what did you do on your first date?
We went to a Greek restaurant on the highway. Then a string quartet on a brand new outdoor place. My mom was there with her two girlfriends and our plan was for them to casually watch it.

Describe the best experience you have had together…
I can’t name a better time. There are a ton.

Which of you is the first to ask for directions when you get lost?
I ask for directions.

If you had the opportunity to have a second all-expenses-paid honeymoon, where would you go?
Our problem is not money. He is simply against air travel because of the CO₂ the plane emits. He is not a fan of those who travel at the moment. The climate emergency is pretty much on his mind most of the time.

What’s the best thing about being married or being with your longtime partner?One of the best things is probably that you’ve reached a point where there’s absolutely nothing to talk about. You realize how foolish it is to put energy into anger. Most of the way you think and what you would say is not new to each other. I think you’re starting to realize that you’ve chosen your teacher and when you stop resisting teaching, everything goes well. We pretty much figured out how to do harmony. I like being married. This month of August will celebrate its 55th anniversary and I consider that to be my greatest achievement!

Cynthia and Kevin McGrath

Where and when did you meet? And what were your first impressions of each other?
We met in high school. I thought he was cool. I thought she was hot.

You are invited to a dinner but you do not want to go. Who is calling the host to cancel?
Kevin, in a carefully crafted text.

When was the last time you danced together and to what song?
Taming Impala’s “frontier”. We didn’t have as much dancing as jumping up and down.

Who does the cooking and what is your favorite thing they do?
Kevin. Grilled swordfish (especially on the beach).

What’s the last thing you read aloud to yourself?
A news article about monkeys who escaped from a truck accident.

Where did you go and what did you do on your first date?
OOn one of our first dates, we had a wedding. We dressed up and drank champagne and danced and had our picture taken. We ended up doing this four or five more times since we got away with it the first time. Crazy children.
We have been together for 23 years. Our 21st wedding anniversary is this summer. fun fact: We got married on Friday the 13th! For each anniversary we give ourselves the “traditional material” as a gift. It’s like a treasure hunt. It could cost $1 or $100.

Describe the best experience you have had together…
See all of our favorite bands.

Which of you is the first to ask for directions when you get lost?
Cyn.

If you had the opportunity to have a second all-expenses-paid honeymoon, where would you go?
An ice hotel in Finland.

What’s the best thing about being married or being with your longtime partner?Laugh all the time.

Beth Kramer and Douglas Reid


Where and when did you meet?
We met at the Plum Beach Inn when I came to the island for a day visit in the summer of 1993. Douglas was the chef there.

And what were your first impressions of each other?
His first impression: “Great, a vegetarian. What a pain!” Mine: “What an asshole.” (I asked if he knew what the weather would be like the next day since I had to take the ferry and he replied: “I don’t know what the weather will be like here, but I know the ski conditions in Chile.”)

You are invited to a dinner but you do not want to go. Who calls the host to cancel?
You know I do.

When was the last time you danced together and to what song?
We danced together to a slow song at Maynard and Basia’s wedding.

Who does the cooking and what is your favorite thing they do?
Douglas is the chef. Although I pretty much all love it, its fresh tomato salad is perhaps the yummiest.

What’s the last thing you read aloud to yourself?
I just read Douglas the story of John and Shirley Mayhew written by Phyllis Mearas in 2005.

Where did you go and what did you do on your first date?
We cycled to Lucy Vincent Beach. There was a lot of swimming and smiling.

Describe the best experience you have had together…
We traveled to Costa Rica in 2005 exploring the mountains and the Pacific coast.

Which of you is the first to ask for directions when you get lost?
It would be me.

If you had the opportunity to have a second all-expenses-paid honeymoon, where would you go?
Douglas would like to go to South Beach, Miami – I would like to take him to the South of France.

What’s the best thing about being married or being with your longtime partner? Camaraderie.

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Health calendar released February 2, 2022 – West Central Tribune https://sailtheory.com/health-calendar-released-february-2-2022-west-central-tribune/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 15:37:00 +0000 https://sailtheory.com/health-calendar-released-february-2-2022-west-central-tribune/ WILLMAR – Aging Wisely: Finding New Confidence and Purpose will meet at 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 3 at the Willmar Community Center. The program is part of a series aimed at meeting the educational, social and nutritional needs of older people. Caregivers, Mary Ellen and Vicki, will share their story of caring for a […]]]>

WILLMAR – Aging Wisely: Finding New Confidence and Purpose will meet at 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 3 at the Willmar Community Center. The program is part of a series aimed at meeting the educational, social and nutritional needs of older people. Caregivers, Mary Ellen and Vicki, will share their story of caring for a loved one with dementia. For more information and to make a reservation, call Britta at 320-262-5288 by 4 p.m. Wednesday, February 2.

WILLMAR – The Breast Cancer Peer Support Group will meet from 6-7:30 p.m. on the first Monday of the month, February 7. The group is for women of all ages who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is facilitated by one of the Care Coordinators at Carris Health Cancer Center. Knowing that everyone has at least one thing in common to bind you together – cancer – can make it easier to open up, share, cry and laugh. Facilitators will make sure no one is forced to share more than they want. To free. Register at CarrisHealth.com/classes-events.

WILLMAR – Heartbeat, a support group for those who have lost a loved one to suicide, will meet from 6-7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 8 at New Directions/Knutson Counseling, 1809 19th Ave. SW to Willmar (opposite Roosevelt School). If you need to talk or meet someone due to a suicide, please feel free to call Diane at 320-894-0182, Kay at 320-262-6162 or Ray and Kim at 320-235-0030 or 320-295-6000 or email yourwingsofhope@gmail.com or Heartbeatwillmar@gmail.com.

The Minnesota River Region Agency on Aging provides advice, information, resources and assistance so seniors can maintain the lifestyle of their choice. To learn more about this and other presentations and training offered by the agency, visit mnraaa.org/calendar. Live chat with a specialist is also available online at www.MinnesotaHelp.info.

NAVIGATE: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., Willmar Community Center, free, all levels. The Stay Active and Independent for Life program relies on strength and balance exercises to protect against fractures caused by osteoporosis by increasing muscle strength, balance and bone density.

LinkAge Senior Line: A free service of the Minnesota Board on Aging, the Senior LinkAge Line is the state health insurance assistance program and Senior Medicare Patrol for Minnesota. Seniors can contact the Senior LinkAge line at 1-800-333-2433 between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays to receive help with questions about Medicare and health insurance, help to find services to stay at home or to pay for medication. Make sure you have a complete list of prescription medications and dosages.

Disability Hub MN: A free, statewide resource network that helps with troubleshooting, navigating the system, and planning for the future. The team knows the ins and outs of community resources and government programs, and has years of experience helping people put them together. Call 1-866-333-2466 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday or find email and live chat options at www.disabilityhubmn.org.

Coffee chat: This statewide telephone chat line for seniors is open from 8 a.m. to noon on weekdays. Call toll free at 877-238-2282. It is staffed by volunteers who understand the needs and challenges of the senior population and are dedicated to alleviating loneliness and social isolation among seniors. Volunteers can offer words of encouragement and understanding and provide information about support and resources available in the person’s community. Calls are free. Caller privacy is a priority, and the only information requested will be the first name. Line users can call as often as they like.

Willmar Meals on Wheels: Hot meals at home are delivered on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. A frozen meal is available for the next day or the weekend. Meals are available for people who cannot cook for themselves due to age, disability, illness or recent discharge from hospital. In addition to the regular meal, three special diet meals are available. Cost is $6.81 and includes all side dishes (including dessert) and milk or juice. Order before 1 p.m. the weekday before the day of delivery by calling 320-235-5310, ext. 219 or 320-894-7401. The menu is available on the West Central Industries website, www.wcimn.org under Business Solutions.

Willmar Senior Dining Room: Meals are served at 11:30 a.m. weekdays and can also be picked up curbside at the Community Center. Meals are open to people aged 60 and over. Suggested donation of $5 per meal. Call 320-262-5288 before noon the day before and leave a message. The menu is available on the City of Willmar website www.willmarmn.gov under Community Center.

The American Red Cross is holding blood drives in the Midwest. To donate blood, you must be at least 17 years old, weigh 110 pounds or more, and be in good health. You can donate blood every 56 days. Double red blood cells can be donated every 112 days. Although all blood types are required, type O and type B negative donors are especially encouraged to donate.

Appointments can be made at 1-800-RED-CROSS or online at www.redcrossblood.org. All donors require acceptable identification. The preferred form is government-issued photo ID, such as a driver’s license or a Red Cross blood donor card. Otherwise, you will need to provide two other pieces of identification, such as a work ID, social security card, personal check, or credit card. Personalized mail such as a utility bill will not be accepted.

The blood drives scheduled for the Tribune area are:

February 2, Clara City: 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., MACCRAY High School
February 2, Morris: 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., University of Minnesota
February 3, Benson: 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., St. Mark’s Lutheran Church
February 3, Morris: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., University of Minnesota
February 4, Benson: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., St. Mark’s Lutheran Church
February 7, Grove City: 1 to 7 p.m., Trinity Lutheran Church
February 14, Willmar: 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Assembly of God Church
February 14, Benson: 1-6 p.m. Swift County – Benson Health Services
February 17, Belgrade: 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Saint-François De Sales Church
February 18, Grove City: 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Atwater-Cosmos-Grove City High School
February 18, Olivia: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. BOLD High School
February 22, Litchfield: 1 to 7 p.m., St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
February 22, Willmar: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Kandiyohi County Historical Society
March 1, Murdock: From 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., Town Hall
March 1, Dawson: Noon to 6 p.m., Dawson-Boyd High School
March 2, Benson: 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Benson High School

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